Info

The Art Biz

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist.
RSS Feed
2022
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2021
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2020
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2019
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2018
December
November
August
July
June
May
April
March
February


2017
December
November
October
September
August
July
March
January


2016
December
October
September
August
July


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: Page 1

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist. https://ArtBizSuccess.com/podcasts/

Nov 28, 2022

Alyson Stanfield walks you through her thoughts on reviewing your year.

There are 3 reasons to bother reviewing your year: (1) To honor life, (2) to remind yourself of what you have accomplished, and (3) to prepare for the New Year. Look at the year holistically in terms of personal, art, learning, and business.

Your written account of the year will be something you can return to in the future as a reminder of what you accomplished, what you experienced, what you learned, who and what you encountered, and more.

Mentioned
The Artist's Annual Review

Resources

 

Nov 17, 2022

Today’s conversation is a first. In this episode of The Art Biz I talk with Rebecca Welz, an artist who claims she’s not all that interested in the art business. But Rebecca, with her many accomplishments, still had plenty of wisdom to share. Our discussion centers around how she sees her art as part of the continuum, and how she encourages her students at Pratt Institute to think holistically about their careers. We discuss meditation, biomimicry, her projects in Guyana and Guatemala with her students, why she’s uninterested in the art business, and what she thinks artists would benefit from focusing on instead.

Highlights

  • “It’s like drawing in space.” Rebecca’s sculpture and gallery representation. (2:44)

  • Teaching art students and exploring the unknown through meditation. (6:22)

  • Thinking is the most important part of the creative process. (11:15)

  • Finding art inspiration in Guyana and Guatemala. (17:04)

  • Biomimicry—innovation inspired by nature. (22:10)

  • The importance of experiencing inspiration from cultures outside your own. (25:35)

  • Taking a holistic approach to your art. (31:13)

  • Rebecca isn’t all that interested in the art business. Here’s why. (36:24)

This Week’s Assignment

Consider how your work is connected to forces outside itself. How is it connected to art history and to other artists? Think of all the people who make your art possible. Who made your supplies? Not the companies, but the people behind the companies. Who gathered natural pigments or precious metals? Who mixed the paints, spun the yarn, stretched the canvas, stocked the paper, or assembled the camera?

Who are the people supporting your efforts?

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “Meditation gives me a lot of peace and equanimity and helps me deal with being a human on the planet.” — Rebecca Welz

  • “Good artwork comes from that place of the unknown.” — Rebecca Welz

  • “I can’t just focus on my art career because there are so many other things that I’m interested in.” — Rebecca Welz

  • “How are you tapping into your own continuum and how’s that working for you?” — Rebecca Welz

About My Guest

Rebecca Welz makes steel sculptures inspired by natural wonders and ecological processes that combine to give us biodiversity. She is represented by June Kelly Gallery in New York City, where she has had numerous solo exhibitions. She has also shown at Grace Borgenicht Gallery and Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, also in New York.

Rebecca’s sculptures have been in solo and group exhibitions in venues such as the Oakland Museum of California, the Heckscher Museum of Art (Huntington, NY), Butters Gallery (Portland, OR), the SciArt Center (Easton, PA), the Cherrystone Gallery (Wellfleet, MA), and Sculpturesite Gallery (San Francisco, CA). Her work can also be found in private and corporate collections, including those of Goldman Sachs, Pfizer, Merck, Prudential Life Insurance Corporation, and Sabre Corporation.



 

Nov 10, 2022

Not too long ago, artists didn’t have to worry about things like their brands. But in an increasingly competitive market, and the noisy online space, we will do better when we know where we fit. Your art is created in the studio, while your brand is created in the minds of viewers, buyers, collectors, gallerists, and curators.

When you know your brand, you know how you want to be perceived in the eyes of others. Your brand helps you make decisions. If opportunities aren’t aligned with your brand, you say no. My guest for this episode of The Art Biz is Alexandra Squire. She has a clear, intentional artist brand, and knew from the get-go what she wanted her business and career to look like. She hired professionals to help her pull together a branded identity to present her work to the world, and it has paid off. Alexandra and I talk about her decisions, marketing, and how she finds time for her painting and business while raising three young girls.

Highlights

  • Alexandra’s long and winding road to becoming an artist. (3:25)

  • “I looked at myself as a brand.” (7:09)

  • Marketing yourself effectively. (11:26)

  • Hiring professional help for your photography. (14:03)

  • Your brand exists in the eye of the viewer. (18:42)

  • Making the trade offs that pay off. (22:16)

  • The moment when you identify your artist brand. (26:20)

  • How Alexandra shows and sells her work. (28:15)

  • Keeping an artist’s schedule while raising a family. (33:38)

This Week’s Assignment

Consider your artist brand. In particular, think about and even write in your journal about this one question: How do you want to be perceived in the minds of others? If you want to take it to the next step, consider whether your social media, newsletter, website, marketing material, and exhibition venues are aligned with how you want to be perceived.

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “I decided from the beginning I wanted to be a certain type of artist.” — Alexandra Squire

  • “You have to present yourself in a certain way, and that’s how people will view you.” — Alexandra Squire

  • “I turned down a bunch of opportunities that I felt didn’t best reflect my brand.” — Alexandra Squire

About My Guest

Alexandra Squire is an abstract painter defined by the pairing of vibrant colors and muted tones to create simple yet deceivingly complex works. She focuses on blending and layering to make pieces that are rich in color and depth with unexpected palettes. Her paintings serve as a metaphor for life in that they depict the multitude of ways in which our experiences meld together. Alexandra’s work has been exhibited nationally, and her paintings are a part of private and corporate collections throughout the United States.

 

Oct 27, 2022

Anyone can open up a gallery—real or virtual—and start selling art. I mean anyone. You don’t have to hold a degree or pass a test. You don’t have to have ethics or morals or know anything at all about art. But I am impressed by what UGallery is doing and the services they have been providing artists and clients since 2006. Everything about them feels different. 

On this episode of The Art Biz, I’m joined by Alex Farkas, founder of UGallery.com.  Their business model is different from others in that online space. They know art. They curate the work so there aren’t thousands of random artists competing for eyeballs. UGallery is paid on commission, so they only make money if art sells.They invest in marketing to help sell more art. They are looking for relationships with their artists and nurture their artists to help them sell better online. The focus of UGallery is on painting, but you should listen to their story even if you are not a painter because you need to know that there are people and companies out there who are on your side and doing things the right way. 

Highlights

  • The beginnings of the UGallery journey. (2:53)

 

  • Storytelling to promote UGallery artists and their work. (4:39)
  • Curating art on the website in non-traditional ways. (7:19)
  • The process of finding and connecting with artists. (11:05)
  • Working with artists to help them succeed. (16:10)
  • What is selling at UGallery? (19:09)
  • Finding and marketing to clients. (20:36)
  • Artist to customer—the order fulfillment process. (23:09)
  • Maintaining ecommerce platforms and client relationships. (28:00)
  • Mistakes that many artists make when applying to UGallery. (33:55)
  • Tips for a better online presentation and ecommerce platform. (36:22)
  • What’s coming next for UGallery. (38:30)

 

This Week’s Assignment

  • Assess where you show and sell your art. Consider what venues you are (and aren’t) working for and why? How can you find more of the right places? What venues aren’t working for you and why? Make a plan to move on from those.

 Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “It’s important that we find ways to combine the old school aspects of a gallery with the new school aspects of the technology that we use.” — Alex Farkas
  • “We see this as a partnership. We don’t succeed unless the artists succeed.” — Alex Farkas
  • “Part of the relationship is making sure that artists understand if they put the time and money in upfront, it comes back out later.” — Alex Farkas
  • “Think about what you’re trying to accomplish and what your goal is, and then work from there.” — Alex Farkas

About My Guest

Alex Farkas is the Gallery Director of UGallery. His love of art traces back to his hometown, Jerome, a tiny arts community in northern Arizona. Alex grew up creating sculptures in his uncle's woodworking studio and learning about the art business in his mother's gallery. He co-founded UGallery in 2006 with the goal of helping emerging artists connect with patrons. As one of the first ever online art galleries, UGallery significantly improved the opportunities available for artists. The gallery has been featured in the New York Times, Vogue, and Art in America. He currently lives, and UGallery is based, in San Francisco.

Oct 13, 2022

The photographer Sally Mann has said that it never occurred to her to look outside of her home, family, and immediate vicinity to find inspiration. So many artists feel they need to travel to exotic locations to find their inspiration, never exploring what is right in front of them or what they encounter in their daily lives.

In this episode of The Art Biz I talk with Sara Lee Hughes, an artist who is deep into a body of narrative paintings with recognizable imagery that is steeped in her personal story—going so far as to include her self-portraits in many of them. We talk about making such personal work and whether there is a market for such work. Sara Lee says her ultimate intention is that she gets under your skin. That when viewing her paintings, you start to question your actions and might find yourself reflecting on the encounter weeks later. We discuss the genesis of this body of work, how she is looking at her art in terms of the long game rather than seeking quick gratification, how she keeps her ideas, and how she has created a discipline that balances motherhood with her studio practice.

Highlights

  • Waiting, Father Daughter Dance, and other pieces inspired by Sara Lee’s life. (1:55)

  • The family letters that have helped Sara Lee navigate her true self. (6:57)

  • Sara Lee’s 12-ft superhero cape and what it represents. (9:05)

  • Painting from experiences results in sincerity. (11:15)

  • Asking yourself questions can lead to your next inspiration. (14:55)

  • Sara Lee’s decision to use her own face in her paintings. (18:19)

  • The value of painting the part of your history that isn’t talked about. (21:32)

  • There are parts of your story that anyone can relate to. (25:17)

  • Using a list—rather than a sketchbook—to keep your ideas. (27:04)

  • Does personal work sell? (30:20)

  • The evolution of Sara Lee’s approach to her art business. (32:39)

  • Finding time for the most important work. (34:32)

Mentioned

The Art Biz Connection

Systematize Your Art Biz for Business Efficiency

Resources

Quotes

  • “These tossed-off sketches are seeds for the work that I’ve done in the last five years.” — Sara Lee

  • “When I paint from my own experience, there’s a sincerity in my paintings.” — Sara Lee

  • “All of my work is my personal experience, so who better to use than myself? — Sara Lee

  • “My intention is to resonate with you through the works that have inspired me to be an artist.” — Sara Lee

About My Guest

Sara Lee is a narrative painter living and working in Lockhart, Texas. Her representational narratives are influenced by growing up in the south during the 1970’s and 80’s with divorced parents and operate as metaphors for discovery, other-ness, identity, connection, balance and truth. As a body of work, they highlight moments, memories and ideas that mark a journey of navigation through the differences between her gay father, straight mother and the socio-cultural norms of the era and those proceeding. In her work she is most interested in exploring and sharing the connection she had with her father before his death of AIDS, the profound guidance it had on her life, and how this personal experience fits into our country’s broader social and cultural heritage.

 

Sara Lee studied classical drawing and painting at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where she earned a certificate in painting and printmaking. She earned her MFA in painting from Pratt Institute. Sustaining herself through scenic painting and teaching, her work brought her back to Lockhart, Texas where she has lived since 2008.



Sep 29, 2022

There is no denying the importance of video these days. Whether you're chasing the Instagram algorithm for reels, streaming live on YouTube, or pulling together a video bio for your website, it's more valuable than ever to make good videos. My guest on The Art Biz is Zach Wolfson, a filmmaker who has seen all kinds of artists' videos—the good, the bad, and the cringy. He has joined me to discuss four of the most common mistakes he sees artists making with their videos, and he also shares simple tips that will greatly improve your videos with just a little bit of tweaking. It’s definitely worth the effort because, as he says, it is so important to leave behind a legacy that extends beyond your artwork.

Highlights

  • Zach’s career in filmmaking led to teaching artists how to make mini art videos. (1:50)

  • Horizontal or vertical filming—which does Zach prefer? (5:50)

  • Mistakes artists make when editing transitions in videos. (7:38)

  • Overproducing filters, text, and other distracting elements. (10:52)

  • Slowing down to capture the perfect shots. (13:53)

  • The best POV in your art films. (17:52)

  • Tips for overcoming your fear of the camera. (20:15)

  • Does Zach recommend time-lapse videos? (23:34)

  • The importance of sharing your story in your videos. (27:31)

  • Leaving the legacy of your art through videos. (32:55)

 

Mentioned

The Art Biz Connection

The Wildly Productive Get Organized Challenge for Your Art Biz

Resources

Quotes

  • “Too many elements can be overwhelming for both you when making the video as well as for the people watching it.”— Zach

  • “Just record for longer than you think you should. Your future self will thank you for it.” — Zach

  • “Your videos themselves don’t need to be art because your art is art.” — Zach

  • “If you can find ways to include yourself in your videos, it will attach you more to your art so people can connect with you.” — Zach

  • “Let us into your world and be able to see you in the context of your space.” — Zach

  • “People aren’t following you because of how well crafted your videos are. They’re following you because of your art.” — Zach

About My Guest

Zach Wolfson is a filmmaker who helps artists make simple art videos to market their art. He is dedicated to empowering artists, and believes everyone can make “mini” art videos that document your journey with ease and joy.

Zach’s greatest passion has always been working directly with artists. He has shared the stories of dozens of artists through his video series, Beyond the Gallery, and taught hundreds more through his blog, in-person training, and now inside his membership community, Ready to Record.

In addition to his work with artists, Zach has made videos sharing human-centered stories for galleries, museums, and companies that include Adobe, Discovery, and Sony.



Sep 22, 2022

Artists crave validation by others. You want your work to be appreciated. Being validated by others helps build confidence and shows us we’re on the right path. But are you looking for validation in the right places?

In this solo episode of The Art Biz, I address validation and earning credibility—where you are probably seeking it, where you might want to look for it instead, and what it really means about your art. Ultimately, validation only comes from within, and others are more likely to pay attention knowing that you value your own work. I want to help you realize the various ways it is possible to earn credibility for your art, many of which you will see that you are already doing.

Highlights

  • Defining validation, self-validation, and credibility. (2:02)

  • The wrong places to turn for self-validation. (3:40)

  • The ultimate expression of validation for an artist. (5:15)

  • Non-social media examples of validation in the art world. (6:43)

  • The pinnacle of exhibition venues—the art museum. (9:45)

  • The value of writing about speaking about your work. (10:55)

  • Seeking validation from the media on a broader level. (11:45)

  • Achieving a higher level of self validation. (14:08)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

The Wildly Productive Get Organized Challenge for Your Art Biz

 

Resources

 

Sep 8, 2022

Detour travels to communities all over to paint socially impactful murals, but he also works on canvas, and in music, installation and sculpture. How does he do it all, and do it all by himself?

In this episode of The Art Biz, I talked with Detour about his various income streams from prints and murals to corporate sponsorships and grants. He is adamant that he doesn't want to be limited by what he currently knows, so he's always learning how to use new technologies that will help him land complex opportunities. He's not afraid to admit that the best way to approach an artistic problem is probably something he hasn't done before. And Detour is big on collaboration and presenting himself in the most professional light because, as he says, you never know who is watching. Be sure to listen for the questions he asks himself before agreeing to take on new work. This is an inspiring conversation that you won’t want to miss.

Highlights

  • Carving out new and alternative paths in the art world. (5:00)

  • Merging your career skills with your creative opportunities. (9:09)

  • How Detour found his artist voice while creating interactive art ‘for the people.’ (11:40)

  • Detour’s active and passive income streams. (17:22)

  • Planning for sporadic paychecks in advance. (22:15)

  • How Detour’s MBA has benefitted his artist endeavors. (25:38)

  • The importance of building relationships with everyone in your artist community. (28:09)

  • Collaborating with other artists to add value to your work. (32:24)

  • Questions to ask when considering—or turning down—opportunities. (34:53)

  • A look at Detour’s typical week. (37:05)

  • Finding fun and balance in the work of every day. (40:18)

  • Why is it important to be an artist who helps other artists? (44:44)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

The Wildly Productive Get Organized Challenge for Your Art Biz

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I want to make sure when I’m presented with an opportunity to solve an idea creatively, I’m not limited by what I’m used to doing.” — Detour

  • “You never know what will work until you throw something out there and it sticks.” — Detour

  • “When you do art you never know exactly who’s looking at it.” — Detour

  • “Everything I do in life is related to art making and sharing.” — Detour

 

Guest Bio

Thomas Evans, a.k.a. Detour, is an all-around creative specializing in large scale public art, interactive visuals, portraiture, immersive spaces, and creative directing. His focus is to create work where art and innovation meet. A born collaborator and “military brat,” Detour pulls from every conceivable experience that shapes his landscapes and perspectives. Explaining Detour’s work is no easy task, as ongoing experimentations in visual art, music, and interactive technologies have his practice continually expanding. With his ever-evolving approach to art, Detour’s focus is on expanding customary views of creativity and challenging fine-art paradigms by mixing traditional mediums with new approaches—all the while opening up the creative process from that of a singular artist to one that thrives on multi-layered collaboration and viewer participation.

Aug 25, 2022

There is no single success formula that works for every artist, but every artist needs some sense of order in their business and life so that they’re ready to respond to opportunities that come along. My guest for this episode is Maria Brito, award-winning New York-based contemporary art advisor, curator and the bestselling author of How Creativity Rules The World. A Harvard graduate, originally from Venezuela, Brito has been selected by Complex Magazine as one of the 20 Power Players in the Art World. She has also been named by ARTnews as one of the visionaries who gets to shape the art world.

Maria has worked to demystify the art world for people who might be otherwise intimidated to enter a gallery, and is an advocate for democratizing the art world for artists and collectors who might be interested in buying art but are not ready to spend tens of thousands of dollars. Maria shares how she works with artists, galleries, and collectors and why she thinks there has never been a better time to be an artist. You won’t want to miss her tips about Instagram and why you can’t afford to ignore this valuable platform.

Highlights

  • Maria’s career was born from what is missing in the art world. (2:35)

  • Democratizing and demystifying the art world. (6:29)

  • Making your own rules when using the free marketing tools of Instagram. (12:32)

  • There is more than one right way to be an artist. (16:06)

  • Maria’s daily interactions with artists. (19:20)

  • How does Maria decide which artist offerings to pursue? (24:22)

  • The role that a curated Instagram feed plays in discovering artists. (30:24)

  • Additional online details that attract Maria to an artist. (35:27)

  • A look into Maria’s new book How Creativity Rules the World. (40:15)

  • Curiosity and the original artist's mind. (46:36)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

The Wildly Productive Get Organized Challenge for Your Art Biz

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “One of the things that helped me succeed was that I was so interested in portraying artists in a different light.” — Maria Brito

  • “We have to acknowledge that, for the most part, these buckets of technology have definitely helped us democratize and streamline and find clients and find collectors that otherwise would be impossible.” — Maria Brito

  • “There hasn’t been a better time in history to be an artist.” — Maria Brito

  • Being able to have control over how you present your message is just a gift.” — Maria Brito

  • “Artists have to treat their Instagram account as their own gallery.” — Maria Brito

  • “The point of being curious is to find more opportunities.” — Maria Brito

 

Guest Bio

Maria Brito is an award-winning New York-based contemporary art advisor, curator and the bestselling author of How Creativity Rules The World. A Harvard graduate, originally from Venezuela, Brito has been selected by Complex Magazine as one of the 20 Power Players in the Art World she was named by ARTnews as one of the visionaries who gets to shape the art world. She has written for publications such as Entrepreneur, Huffington Post, Elle, Forbes, Artnet, Cultured Magazine, Departures, and more. In 2019, she launched “Jumpstart”, an online program on creativity that has been taken by over 1000 people ranging from artists to entrepreneurs.

 

Aug 11, 2022

There’s always plenty to be learned from artists who have been making a go of it for decades. Just think about how much has changed in 30 years! In this episode of The Art Biz, my guest is Willie Cole, a self-described perceptual engineer with an impressive list of collaborations under his belt and even more in the works. Together we talk about the faith he has in his work as a result of being consistent throughout the years. And why he says work is a bad word and prefers to approach his studio in the spirit of play.

We discussed his art and why he challenges people to perceive recognizable objects, like shoes and musical instruments, in new ways. You’ll hear how one of his Instagram posts — where he mocked up his art as if to appear on the cover of Vogue — led to collaborations with major fashion brands. Such opportunities continue coming his way, which might be the result of his faith in his practice. Spoiler: Visualizing success plays a role.

Highlights

  • Willie calls himself a perceptual engineer, but what exactly does that mean? (3:12)

  • The importance (if any) of showing the materials Willie uses to create his work, including 75 cut-up guitars. (5:35)

  • “Planning makes it feel too much like a job.” How Willie approaches his work instead. (11:02)

  • A peek inside Willie’s studio. (13:58)

  • Work is a bad word, but play can make your business better every day. (15:55)

  • Staying in a playful mindset in every stage of production. (19:15)

  • The value of improvisation and the value of not knowing everything. (21:08)

  • Willie feels like the luckiest business person in America. (23:40)

  • The business-minded people that makeup Willie’s team and insights into his collaborations. (25:36)

  • Propelling yourself forward in spite of your fears. (35:24)

  • The difference between fashion industry collaborations and gallery relationships. (37:51)

  • The music on Willie’s current playlist and what is coming up next in his work. (40:28)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

The Wildly Productive Get Organized Challenge for Your Art Biz

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “Play is play, and the opposite of play, I guess, would be work.” — Willie Cole

  • “It becomes work rather than play when it becomes a money-making business.” — Willie Cole

  • “Knowing has limitations because once you find something, you only see it as that.” — Willie Cole

  • “I feel like the luckiest business person in America.” — Willie Cole

  • “When passion marries intention and it can be monetized, it’s work but it’s also just joy.” — Willie Cole

  • “To proceed with confidence and fearlessness, I have to believe that opportunities connect.” — Willie Cole

  • “Connections open up so many doors, they keep the fear way behind me.” — Willie Cole

 

Guest Bio

Willie Cole calls himself a perceptual engineer. Whether he is using the symbolism of a steam iron or the shapes of high fashion shoes and recognizable musical instruments, he challenges how we look at things. While he has had solo exhibitions at esteemed institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art, Miami Art Museum, and Montclair Art Museum, Willie embraces nontraditional avenues for his work, such as collaborations with major fashion brands. He is represented by Alexander and Bonin Gallery in New York, Maus Contemporary Gallery (Alabama), Gavlak Gallery (Los Angeles/Florida), and Kavi Gupta Gallery (Chicago). Willie lives and works in New Jersey.

Jul 28, 2022

I can’t resist legal cases about art, from thefts and forgeries to copyright infringement to gallery dealers and so-called experts who end up in front of a judge for defrauding collectors. While most artists will never see the inside of a courtroom, you might be concerned with copyright infringement or receive unsettling news that someone is using your creative work without your permission. Every artist (you) should know the basics for protecting their art. In this episode of The Art Biz, I am joined by Kathryn Goldman, an intellectual property and internet law attorney who helps creative professionals protect their work so they can profit from it. She is the founder of The Creative Law Center website and membership program, which offers understandable information, actionable strategies, and easy to use tools for the development of creative businesses. Our conversation focuses around Kathryn’s Four Step Framework to help you identify, protect, monitor, and enforce your creative rights.

Highlights

  • Kathryn is an intellectual property attorney who helps creative professionals protect their copyrights, trademarks and brilliant business ideas. (2:45)

  • The four step framework that helps artists know what, when and how to take action. (4:45)

  • Copyright 101- identify the rights that a copyright protects and what is not covered. (7:13)

  • Protect your artwork with a copyright registration. (12:25)

  • Filing in small claims court for infringement can result in $15,000 payout. (15:33)

  • Trademarks are source identifiers that protect against consumer confusion. (18:31)

  • Keith Haring, Banksy, and other famous artist trademarks. (21:00)

  • Does an artist need to register a copyright for every single thing they make? (30:35)

  • Protection is the combination of copyright, trademark, and contract. (33:05)

  • FARE contracts keep the right to control a piece in the hands of the artist. (35:09)

  • Artists with a secondary market stand to benefit greatly from a FARE contract. (39:10)

  • Monitoring your work to determine if it’s been stolen is up to you (and your tribe). (41:30)

  • How I handled copyright infringement of my writing. (46:24)

  • The ladder of enforcement offers options for reaction when someone is stealing your work. (49:55)

  • The recipe for registering your most valuable work is essential. (57:07)

  • Kathryn’s upcoming programs and workshops. (59:05)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

Grow Your List

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I like it when artists understand when they need to take action, what action they need to take, and how to do it effectively and efficiently.” — Kathryn Goldman

  • “The right to control those kinds of changes to the art comes from the copyright.” — Kathryn Goldman

  • “A lot of working artists have trademarks, especially those who are building a business on licensing their art.” — Kathryn Goldman

  • “Copyright is not as strong as trademark, and trademark is not as strong as a good contract.” — Kathryn Goldman

  • “With this combination of tools, I think we really are going to start seeing some interesting things happen with contracts in the art world.” — Kathryn Goldman

  • “The best infringement protection is going to be your tribe.” — Kathryn Goldman

 

 

Guest Bio

Kathryn Goldman is an intellectual property and internet law attorney who helps creative professionals protect their work so they can profit from it. She believes sustainable businesses are built on properly protected creative assets. Kathryn runs the Creative Law Center website and membership program. The Creative Law Center provides innovative creatives with the affordable business and legal resources they need when evolving from artist to entrepreneur. The Creative Law Center offers understandable information, actionable strategies, and easy to use tools for the development of creative businesses. Kathryn practices law in Baltimore, Maryland.

 

Jul 14, 2022

An artist’s best resource is another artist. And to really know what a real artist’s life looks like on a daily basis, you have to study and talk to those artists. You can read their biographies, watch their videos, and listen to them on podcasts, including this one. In this episode of The Art Biz, I talk with Geoffrey Gorman about what it’s like to be a working artist, an identity he came to later in life and has sustained for nearly two decades. Geoffrey and I discuss his background as a furniture maker, gallery dealer, and artist consultant and how each role has contributed to his life as an artist. He also reveals how he approaches his work, where he finds inspiration, his take on how the art world is changing, and his advice to artists in the rapidly-evolving market.

Highlights

  • “You can make something from anything.” The evolution of Geoffrey’s process. (2:35)

  • Journeying back into the arts after a 30-year break. (8:45)

  • Geoffrey’s timeline from furniture maker to gallery dealer, artist coach to full-time artist. (11:08)

  • What does being an artist look like in Geoffrey’s material-driven world? (16:02)

  • Carving a whale and honoring the passing of time. (23:21)

  • Tactics for increasing your credibility as an artist. (28:02)

  • Evolving with the demands of a constantly changing art world. (31:16)

  • Navigating your relationships with dealers. (36:02)

  • Feedback worth soliciting as an artist. (38:55)

  • The importance of connections as a small business owner. (43:00)

  • How can artists utilize social media to find collectors and curators? (48:00)

  • A look at where Geoffrey is putting his efforts next. (50:22)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

Optimize Your Online Marketing

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I realized I had to create this world that I was producing.” — Geoffrey Gorman

  • “You are the number one expert about your work in the world.” — Geoffrey Gorman

  • “A lot of old benchmarks are now gone for artists.” — Geoffrey Gorman

  • “There are so many opportunities for us as artists out there.” — Geoffrey Gorman

  • “Your best resource is another artist.” — Geoffrey Gorman

 

Guest Bio

Geoffrey Gorman was born in Paris, France, but eventually moved to and grew up on an old horse farm in the countryside near Baltimore, Maryland. The dilapidated architecture and abandoned quarries of his childhood influence and inspire the found material sculptures the artist creates today. Gorman has worked as a contemporary furniture designer, gallery dealer, curator, and art consultant before becoming a full-time professional artist. He has exhibited nationally and internationally, including in China and South Korea. Gorman’s work is in public and private collections, including the Racine Art Museum and the University of Colorado.

Jun 23, 2022

If you have ever wanted to shoot the breeze with a gallerist, you will want to pay close attention to this episode of The Art Biz. I’m joined today by Jeremy Tessmer, the gallery director at Sullivan Goss Gallery in Santa Barbara, California. In our conversation, Jeremy shares his views of artist’s professionalism, what he thinks of online platforms, and how he taught himself art history (and why that was important to him).

Jeremy describes Sullivan Goss as an on-ramp for collectors and artists—one that connects their roster of local, regional, national, and international artists. You’ll hear him discuss 3 qualities that he looks for in artists, two of which are non-negotiable, and how he views the artists in his gallery as a family. He says that “dealers should have some sense of responsibility for the well-being of their artists,” and, as you listen to our conversation, you’ll understand why that has become so important to him.

Highlights

  • The niche that the Sullivan Goss Gallery fills and Jeremy’s role within it. (2:37)

  • Sullivan Goss is an on-ramp gallery with the aim of expanding the art world. (7:49)

  • The different art world need to become more aware of each other. (10:05)

  • Jeremy’s journey from writer and tech specialist to art gallerist. (14:04)

  • Is it important for artists to be steeped in art history? (23:34)

  • Overcoming the anxiety of influence to connect with other artists. (26:21)

  • The 3 qualities Jeremy looks for in the artists he represents. (33:30)

  • The responsibility a gallery has for nurturing its artists’ careers. (36:10)

  • The value of understanding the long game and defining your real interest in an artist’s career. (41:11)

  • Things an artist should never say or do to gain the attention of a gallerist. (46:18)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

Optimize Your Online Marketing

 

Resources

 

Guest Bio

Jeremy Tessmer is the Gallery Director and Curator of vintage American art at Sullivan Goss. He has been with the firm almost 20 years, working in every area of the business, including: curation, sales, marketing, and design of everything from exhibition spaces to internal databases and processes. He has special knowledge of the American Modern movement, especially as it occurred on the West Coast. He has also been heavily involved with the gallery’s publication program, helping to produce nineteen books and numerous catalogs, including those on local artists Ray Strong and Hank Pitcher.

 

Jun 9, 2022

The resources you have for art business and career development are endless. In that respect, you are incredibly fortunate compared to artists of the past who had so little to help them make a go of it. And there is a downside. There are so many choices to grow as a professional artist that it’s difficult to decide where to spend your time and money. 

How do you decide? How do you know when to invest, and when to save your money?

Let’s pretend you are my coaching client and you’re debating adding something to your calendar. I caution all students and clients to be judicious about adding more to their already full schedules. 

This episode is focused on the questions I’d ask to help you decide whether or not a program is right for you. These include ...

What do you want to get from this program?

Is this program a shiny distraction?

Are you in a place to receive the guidance?

Do you respect the presenters, teachers, or leaders?

How is this program different?

Are you willing to devote the time to the lessons and homework?

See featured artists, read, and leave a comment >> TRANSCRIPT+POST

MENTIONED

Optimize Your Online Marketing

The Art Biz Connection membership community

Tom Kuegler's LinkedIn Sprint

May 12, 2022
We usually start a long-term project with a specific goal or set of expectations in mind. Rarely does the project turn out the way we thought it would. More often than not, it’s better than we had imagined. But before we can get to that point of admitting that the change might have actually led to an improvement in the original plan, we have to struggle, to question our assumptions or to ask for more help or more money. We recognize we can’t continue working in the same fashion as before, and often we are forced to adjust to outside forces, like a worldwide pandemic.

In this episode of The Art Biz, I’m joined again by Eve Jacobs-Carnahan. She was a podcast guest over a year ago and has come back to offer an update on her project, Knit Democracy Together, which was developed to discuss the U.S. electoral system within the context of knitting circles.

Today Eve is sharing a look at how such a long-term project evolves. She outlines the 5 indicators she is using to measure effectiveness, and even if you don’t have an art project focused on making a social impact, these indicators will be useful for appraising the successful reach of your exhibition, event, program, or teaching.

Highlights

  • “It all took on a new significance.” Eve’s project changed after the 2020 election. (4:27)

  • The reasons behind improvements in the knitting circle. (8:11)

  • The mindset shift that created positive changes to the project format. (10:02)

  • Eve’s preparation helped secure her fellowship. (11:41)

  • Collaboration changes and letting go of tight control over the project. (13:28)

  • The topics that the project covers now are not the same as the initial intended ones. (19:25)

  • 5 indicators to measure effectiveness in any project. (24:44)

  • Applying these tools to measure other areas of success. (31:40)

  • A look at what’s coming next for Eve. (36:40)

  • The evolution of Eve’s expanded exhibition. (39:11)

 

Mentioned

 

The Art Biz Connection

Join Optimize Your Online Marketing starting May 26, 2022

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I have definitely let go of some control, and that’s been good.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan

  • “I realized that I wasn’t going to be as effective by myself.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan

  • “I’m talking about what people can do to help strengthen the system so we don’t have chaos, all while knitting.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan

  • “Change can happen step by step, stitch by stitch and with many people working together.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan

  • “Artists who want to do social impact work definitely can be using these tools.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan

  • “Think about the people you know, think about your relationships with them, and be willing to ask for help.” — Eve Jacobs-Carnahan

 

Guest Bio

 

Eve Jacobs-Carnahan makes mixed media knitted sculpture exploring democracy. She uses the comforting quality of yarn and the charming attraction of birds to tell allegorical stories.

 

Eve’s work appears in Astounding Knits! 101 Spectacular Knitted Creations and Daring Feats by Lela Nargi and garnered First Place in National Fiber Directions 2015 at the Wichita Center for the Arts. She was named a Creative Community Fellow: New England by National Arts Strategies in 2021.

 

Eve knit away stress while earning a B.A. in History with Honors from Swarthmore College and a J.D. from the University of Chicago. She lives in Vermont.

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/effective-projects-carnahan-podcast

Apr 28, 2022
Some artists just know what they want, and some know what they don’t want. My guest for this episode has a lot of clarity about both. On this episode of The Art Biz, I’m talking with Alicia Goodwin, who worked as a jewelry designer for a number of individuals and companies before transitioning to her own full time jewelry business, Lingua Nigra.

As an encourager, Alicia wants artists to go for it. She doesn’t believe in even considering a plan B in case the art thing doesn’t work out. She encourages artists to “find your people” because she knows what it’s like to be an artist and misunderstood by those closest to you. She found support in an online community filled with people who were making things and talking about business.

Even if you’re not a jewelry artist, I know you will be inspired by Alicia’s desire to continually improve her circumstances and grow her business. You especially won’t want to miss her insights into finding the right balance in your online presence. As she says, “You don’t need a lot of followers to make a lot of sales.”

 

Highlights

  • “I was always plotting for the next thing.” (2:44)

  • Alicia’s transition from FIT to in-demand jewelry artist. (10:56)

  • Finding the people who share your passion. (19:05)

  • The origin story of Lingua Nigra (24:48)

  • Alicia’s forgiving etching and molding processes. (28:50)

  • What is considered costume jewelry? (33:31)

  • Alicia encourages ambitious artists to just get started. (37:30)

  • Taking the first step toward your next big thing. (42:05)

  • Finding a mentor, a support group, and the right sales outlets for your business. (48:50)

  • Growing your studio and your team to match your big ideas. (52:30)

  • A look at what’s coming up next for Alicia. (57:36)

 

Mentioned

 

Sign up for the next Artist Planning Sessions May 10-13, 2022

Join Optimize Your Online Marketing starting May 26, 2022

 

Resources

 

Guest Bio

Alicia Goodwin is a Chicago based jeweler who specializes in adding unique textures to her sculptural jewelry. A graduate of New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology., Alicia applies her knowledge of ancient techniques like reticulation and acid etching to her more contemporary designs.

Her love of complex ancient ceremonial jewelry created with minimal tools such as fire, sand and beeswax led her to truly admire the work produced throughout Mesoamerica and the African diaspora—influencing her own brand, Lingua Nigra.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/next-opp-goodwin-podcast

 

Apr 7, 2022
Have you ever experienced success in any area and then realized it wasn’t exactly what you wanted after all? My guest today experienced unexpected and surprising growth as her Instagram following quickly grew from 10,000 followers to over 70,000 followers in just a few years. In this episode of The Art Biz, I’m talking to Sara Schroeder. We talk about the creative way that she overcame her fear of selling and what she wishes she had known to do differently while in the throes of that success.

For more than a year, Sara has been using tools like journaling and the Enneagram to discover more about herself and explore where she wants her work to go, and now she's looking for more. She knows there's a deeper level of fulfillment beyond posting and looking for sales online, so she has stepped back and reassessed. You'll hear Sara mention her upcoming solo show, which is part of a challenge that I issue to students in my seasonal programs. We also discuss why her Instagram strategy has changed and what her new approaches for Instagram and marketing in general.

 

Highlights

  • “I fell in love with making art all over again.” (2:00)

  • The value of finding a dedicated space for your art. (7:11)

  • The difference between Sara’s maximum and minimal art. (10:18)

  • Sara’s success on Instagram took off and quickly became overwhelming. (12:20)

  • When app demands take over making artwork. (18:55)

  • The evolution of Sara’s work since pulling back from Instagram. (24:07)

  • The process of self discovery through journaling, meditating, and the Enneagram. (28:01)

  • Details of Sara’s latest 100-piece collection. (32:00)

  • How Sara would have handled her initial success and systems differently. (34:49)

  • Sara’s modified Instagram presence and increased in-person collaborations. (39:47)

  • Sara’s typical work week and why she starts work at 11 AM. (46:32)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/growing-schroeder-podcast

 

Guest Bio

Sara Schroeder is an abstract painter using gestural movement, intuitive marks, and saturated colors to convey energy and emotion. Works on canvas and paper feature drips, swipes, scratching, and subtraction methods, which build upon one another to form abstractions of nature. She finds inspiration in the potent hues of tropical plant life and the subdued pastel motifs of the Art Deco period preserved in Miami. Identifying with Kandinsky’s belief that color influences the soul, Sara's process incorporates the psychology of color, intuition, and chance.

 

Integrating into her work what psychotherapist Carl Rogers called “unconditional positive regard”, she aims to inspire rich revelations and encounters of the human spirit. Her works are held nationally and around the world in hundreds of private collections.

Apr 6, 2022

You are not alone.

It may seem like you are at times because you do so much work by yourself in the studio, but the art ecosystem is enormous and you are not alone. There are so many good people who are advocating on behalf of and supporting artists in their businesses and careers. I want you to know about these resources so that you can tap into them. They’re waiting for you.

In this episode of The Art Biz, I’m talking with Louise Martorano, the Executive Director at RedLine Contemporary Art Center in Denver, Colorado. RedLine is a nonprofit whose mission is to foster “education and engagement between artists and communities to create positive social change.” In many ways, RedLine behaves like a traditional arts council. But they’re far from it. Louise and I discuss their artist-in-residence program, affordable studio space, and how they collaborate with other art organizations in the U.S. and beyond.

 

Highlights

  • The history and mission of RedLine Contemporary Art Center. (1:45)

  • The local and global need for artist career support. (7:46)

  • Visual arts coalitions fill in the gaps of an artist’s career. (11:23)

  • The staff, budget, and $22 million re-granting programs at RedLine. (19:15)

  • Details on residencies, applications, and juried interviews. (25:18)

  • Open studio doors increase opportunities for artists. (32:03)

  • Commission opportunities, stipends, and other program benefits. (33:58)

  • How to find artist support programs in your community. (37:19)

  • Group meetings and other expectations of artist residents. (41:01)

  • Auditing relationships and leveraging your community. (45:45)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/advocate-martorano-podcast

 

Quotes

 

  • “Artists are really expected to be all the departments in their career.” — Louise Martorano

  • “Artists’ careers can live and die on the relationships they build and the opportunities they have.” — Louise Martorano

  • “We’re trying to link arms with each other in Colorado to see if we can create a more seamless journey for artists as they gain traction and opportunity in their careers.” — Louise Martorano

  • “Talking about your work is like exercising a muscle. The more you do it, the more refined your language is.” — Louise Martorano

  • “Artists need to reevaluate who they know and who they’re connected to and see how they can use those arteries of opportunity.” — Louise Martorano

 

Guest Bio

Louise Martorano is the Executive Director of RedLine, a non-profit contemporary art center and residency located in Denver, Colorado. RedLine's mission is to foster education and engagement between artists and communities to create positive social change. Under Martorano’s leadership, RedLine has received the Denver Mayor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts (2014 and 2015), the Greenway Foundation’s “Partner in Change” award, acknowledged by Denver Public Schools for excellence in community engagement, and has presented and organized over 100 exhibitions over the past 10 years.

 

Martorano holds a B.A. from the University of Colorado, Boulder, and an M.H. from the University of Colorado, Denver with a focus in Contemporary Art History & Music. In 2017, she was awarded a Livingston Fellowship from the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation for promising nonprofit leaders who hold significant leadership roles in Colorado.

 

Mar 10, 2022
Artists need writers. They are a critical part of the art ecosystem. Look back on any art movement from the past century in the U.S. and you’ll find a writer behind its day in the spotlight. My guest for this episode of The Art Biz is artist and writer Philip Hartigan. As you’ll hear, he’s not quite sure what order those labels should be in. In some respects, the writing came first, but the art has always been there. We talk about his writing life, the role that blogging has had for him, and how he came to be a correspondent for Hyperallergic online art magazine. You’ll also hear about how writing has helped him make inroads into the art world. My hope is that you will consider writing more about not just your art, but about other artists’ work, possibly for publication and definitely for connections within your art community.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/art-reviewer-hartigan-podcast 

Highlights

  • James Joyce, literature and Philip’s journey as an artist. (1:54)

  • The subtle narrative of Philip’s current work and his gradual return to painting. (7:19)

  • How did Philip get into writing about art for publication? (10:13)

  • Overcoming disdain for a personal art blog in favor of clarity. (13:24)

  • Writing for an online publication and becoming an online correspondent. (18:25)

  • Creating meaningful connections through writing. (24:45)

  • The value of blogging in an Instagram world. (30:18)

  • Finding your why behind writing about your art. (39:00)

  • What is on the horizon for Philip? (42:20)

Mentioned

Resources

 

 

Guest Bio

Philip Hartigan is a UK-born artist and writer who now lives, works, and teaches in the USA.

Hartigan’s art explores half-remembered moments from a childhood in an English mining town. His choice of materials depends on the emotional state he has arrived at after thinking about these stories. But whether it’s oil painting, intaglio printmaking, or sculpture, he aims to either tell a story in visual art or look for universally-recognized symbols for memory, loss, tragedy. Hartigan has lived for short and long periods in France, Spain, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Holland.

Feb 24, 2022
Members of the general public enjoy their visits to art centers and museums without much thought as to how the art got into those spaces in the first place. Who decides on what to show and when to show it? Who decides what works to put next to one another and where to put a nail in the wall or a pedestal on the floor? Or even what color to paint the walls? All of these decisions, and more, fall under the purview of curators and exhibition directors in those non-profit spaces. In this episode of The Art Biz I talk with Collin Parson, the Director of Galleries and Curator at the Arvada Center for Arts and Humanities in the Denver suburb of Arvada, Colorado. Collin reveals how the exhibition process works at their venue: his timeline, rotating gallery spaces, and the decision makers at the organization. We also discuss how he selects artists for shows, what makes an artist easy and fun to work with, and why it’s important that artists keep him informed. Be sure to pay attention to some of the big mistakes he sees artists making.

Highlights

  • Collin’s background of artists and his work as a curator. (1:30)

  • Curating a massive space and Collin’s approach to rotating exhibitions. (10:50)

  • Scheduling artists into a gallery’s calendar isn’t as simple as it seems. (19:15)

  • Why Collin generally doesn’t accept exhibit proposals. (22:52)

  • What makes an artist fun to collaborate with? (26:48)

  • What Collin wishes every artist would do—and not do. (33:03)

  • Studio visits and what curators expect from artists. (38:25)

  • Finding inspiration for the most memorable shows. (45:35)

  • Details about juried shows and artist rosters. (48:55)

  • Balancing curating exhibits, making art, and a personal life. (55:03)

Mentioned

Resources

 

 

Guest Bio

Born and raised in Denver, Colorado, Collin Parson currently serves as the Director of Galleries and Curator for the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities in Arvada, Colorado and is a former member at the historic Pirate: Contemporary Art cooperative and past artist-in-residence at RedLine Denver. An arts administrator, artist, curator, and designer he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater Design and Technology with emphasis in Lighting and Scene Design from the University of Colorado at Boulder and his Master in Arts in Visual Culture and Arts Administration from Regis University in Denver. His creative work involves the control of light and color to create vivid geometric light and space works. He has had the privilege of jurying many arts festivals and exhibitions and has received numerous awards and recognition for his curatorial projects. He was awarded 100 Colorado Creatives by Westword magazine in 2013 and featured in many television and print productions. Parson is the son of Colorado sculptor Charles Parson, whose experience with the regions arts community helped Collin long before his professional career began. Growing up in a family of artists, Collin is proud to be continuing the educational and creative traditions.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/curator-parson-podcast

Feb 10, 2022
For too long I have been noticing artists posting things like this on social media: ‘Fresh off the easel! What do you think?’ or ‘I'm experimenting with <this or that>. Let me know what you think!’

What do I think? Do you really want to know what I think?

In this solo episode of The Art Biz I want to talk about feedback. When you ask people ‘what do you think’ you are asking for their feedback, whether it’s intentional or not. We are often too quick to ask for feedback, and we ask for it in ways that can be more damaging than anything. In this episode, I’ll share what I’ve learned from wise women and from paying attention to my students and clients. I’ll give you tips on the right way to ask for feedback—in the right environment and with specificity. I’ll also share with you how to handle unsolicited advice and the best way to offer advice to others, all so that you can get better feedback when you are seeking to improve.

Highlights

  • The best time and way to ask for feedback. (1:36)

  • 4 criteria to meet before asking for feedback. (2:25)

  • You don’t really need feedback from everyone else. (5:35)

  • When feedback actually becomes necessary in order to improve. (7:45)

  • Asking for feedback from the right people. (9:15)

  • How to ask for feedback with specificity. (11:14)

  • The right way to offer feedback to others. (12:38)

  • How to respond to feedback graciously. (14:33)

Resources

 

Mentioned

Quotes

  • “We’re often too quick to ask for feedback, and we ask for it in ways that are damaging.” — Alyson Stanfield

  • “You shouldn’t care what everyone thinks.” — Alyson Stanfield

  • “You need time to figure out what you think about your art before you ask others what they think about it.” — Alyson Stanfield

  • “At some point, feedback is necessary when you want to improve, but you have to set up the parameters.”— Alyson Stanfield

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/feedback

Jan 13, 2022

Risk is scary. Rejection stinks. Resilience seems elusive. When I think of these three R words, the word practice comes to mind. Taking one step at a time over and over again because we know it is the only way to make big progress. In order to embrace risk, we have to practice. We step into it, try it on, and, almost always, discover that it isn’t as bad as the soundtrack we were playing in our heads. Rejection is also a practice. We build up emotional muscles after receiving disappointing news. After years of accumulated rejections, we begin to understand that they are rarely, if ever, personal. And finally, resilience is something we have to work at. We were born resilient, but, over the years, life beat us up. But rejections give us courage muscles we never had before. And, because we paid attention, we pick up on a number of tools that help us become more resilient.

My guest for this episode of The Art Biz is Christine Aaron. You’ll hear how she embraces risk and has come to understand the role of rejection in her art career. She also shares the tools she relies on to act with resilience, to get back in the studio and do it all over again.

Highlights

  • The unusual motivation behind Christine’s first watercolor class selection. (2:08)

  • Taking risks and challenging yourself in a rewarding art career. (5:31)

  • Refining your art by sharing it with and soliciting critique from others. (12:45)

  • Identifying your safe zone and moving beyond it. (21:45)

  • Taking on the work that pushes you out of your comfort zone. (25:12)

  • Name the risks to work your way through the potential rejection. (32:57)

  • What rejection really means about the work that you’re doing. (39:46)

  • Honing your resilience skills amid rejection. (40:35)

  • Stop comparing yourself to other artists and remember how far you’ve come. (45:45)

  • Reflecting on your work, your processes, and your improvement. (47:06)

  • The risks that Christine is going to take in 2022. (48:00)

Mentioned

Resources

 

Quotes

 

  • “There’s not one of us that hasn’t experienced disappointment and loss in life.” — Christine Aaron

  • “I make work ultimately because I want it to resonate with someone else. And the only way to do that is to get it out there.” — Christine Aaron

  • “Think beyond what you can imagine now and know that you’ll have the ability to get the resources you need to do it.” — Christine Aaron

  • “Every artist I know gets way, way more rejections than they get acceptances. But nobody is talking about that.” — Christine Aaron

 

Guest Bio

Christine Aaron is a conceptual and material-focused artist. Her work is exhibited nationally and internationally. Aaron received an artist’s grant from ArtsWestchester — New York State Council on The Arts, a Surface Design Association grant, and a residency and grant from Vermont Studio Center. She presents talks at The International Encaustic Conference in Provincetown, MA, received awards in printmaking and mixed media, and had a solo exhibit of The Memory Project at California Museum of Art Thousand Oaks.

Aaron holds a BS in education from Cornell University and a Masters in Social Work from Hunter College. She lives and maintains a studio in New Rochelle, NY.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/rejection-aaron-podcast

Dec 30, 2021

Why is it so hard for us to take care of ourselves? We all get busy. We feel a sense of urgency to keep up and do more. But if we're honest, we realize that very little is really urgent. Still, all of this hustle means we neglect habits and routines that will keep us well and give us energy for work in and out of the studio. And it's even harder when you're also responsible for caring for others. Whether you're a parent with growing children or an adult with aging parents, caregiving can take a lot out of you. It's hard to spend time on yourself when you're maxed out on so many levels. It's no wonder that self-care takes a backseat to other priorities.

On this episode of The Art Biz, I’m joined by Shimoda Donna Emmanuel. Shimoda has been the caregiver in her family, primarily for her mother Izola who recently passed after living with Alzheimer's, but also for an ailing sister. In 2020, Shimoda wrote Sacred Stitches: The Art of Care Giving, which has tips for stitching yourself together when caring for someone with Alzheimer's, but can also be useful to other caregiving roles. Together Shimoda and I talk about her routine, how she keeps her home to maintain a high vibration, tools she uses to de-stress and to stay calm, and how gratitudes and "the rage dance" fit into her self-care routine.

Highlights

  • The fiber collages, jewelry, circles of love and sacred stitches of Shimoda’s work. (2:13)

  • Shimoda wrote Sacred Stitches during the pandemic while caring for her mother. (7:29)

  • Key tips for de-stressing as a caregiver artist. (14:20)

  • How to keep your energy high so you can stay positive and productive. (24:52)

  • Spring cleaning takes on a new meaning with self-care. (28:40)

  • Finding a support group that can give you the support you need. (31:16)

  • Handling emotions might mean screaming, crying and doing a rage dance. (34:51)

  • How to cultivate a space that helps you destress. (36:30)

  • Making time for sleep and watching your diet. (40:45)

  • ‘Let this be easy’- Shimoda’s mantra for hectic days. (46:05)

  • A peek at what Shimoda is looking forward to in the New Year, and where her name came from. (49:10)

Mentioned

Resources

 

Quotes

 

  • “I’ve got to take care of myself. The caregiver has to take care of themselves.” — Shimoda Donna Emanuel

  • “I’ve got to keep my energy high and keep my vibration high. That’s what’s most important to me.” — Shimoda Donna Emanuel

  • “It’s just not good to hold it all in. I can get through emotions quicker if I just let myself deal with the feelings.” — Shimoda Donna Emanuel

 

Guest Bio

Shimoda Donna Emanuel is a mixed media artist living in Harlem, N.Y. Shimoda Accessories has a range of work that includes intuitive jewelry & fiber art. Her art has been on HGTV as well as the covers of Essence magazine and other publications. Her art is available for purchase at The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

As a caregiver of her sister and her 97-year young mom with Alzheimer’s, Shimoda wrote Sacred Stitches: The Art of Caregiving. This colorful book offers tips for other caregivers. She found solutions that worked for her with creative exercises, rituals, and more.

Shimoda also published Sacred Stitches: Fiber Art Dolls for the Soul and Sacred Stitches, an inspirational 25-piece card deck.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/caregiving-shimoda-podcast

Dec 16, 2021

We need art. Some of us need it more than others, and for some of us, it's as necessary as the air we breathe. My guest on this episode of The Art Biz is Rich Simmons, a London-based artist who insists that art saved his life. Rich is not an art therapist, but he is an advocate for the therapy of an art practice. He knows from first-hand experience that art heals.

Rich has struggled with depression and was eventually diagnosed with Aspergers. The realization that making art could make him feel better was life-changing, and he wanted other people to know about this. In 2008 he started Art Is The Cure to inspire people to turn to creativity in times of pain. Art has given his life purpose. In our conversation, you’ll hear that Rich has many balls up in the air. He makes murals, gives workshops, sells prints, has recently entered the NFT market, and is starting a podcast. And that is just scratching the surface of his inspiring ambitions.

Highlights

  • “I was thrown into the deep end.” Rich’s unusual entry into the art world. (2:51)

  • Rich started on his artistic path at a very young age by trading art with his grandfather. (7:57)

  • Discovering art as a form of creative therapy amidst personal turmoil. (11:49)

  • The act of creative release has expanded Rich’s spectrum and allows him to make better art. (17:44)

  • Art Is The Cure gave Rich the purpose he needed to move forward. (24:50)

  • How to channel your negative energy in a way that affects change. (33:48)

  • Finding inspiration, community and movement, and what to do when art is the source of your stress. (36:50)

  • Rich’s income stream and his approach to creating a continual stream of potential clients. (41:50)

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “I want to give back to art because art saved my life.” — Rich Simmons

  • “I like to say yes to opportunities no matter what it is and try to figure out how to do it.” — Rich Simmons

  • “I realized I had found my own version of art therapy, and I needed to help other people discover their own version of art therapy.” — Rich Simmons

  • “An artist’s job is not only to be a storyteller but to evoke emotions.” — Rich Simmons

  • “I couldn't be an inspiration for people if I wasn’t looking after myself.” — Rich Simmons

  • “You can be the messenger about how powerful art can be.” — Rich Simmons

 

Guest Bio

 

Rich Simmons is an Urban Pop artist who has exhibited all over the world. Simmons' work explores the intersections of visual culture, spanning pop art, comic books, the Renaissance, contemporary fashion, sexuality and beyond.

 

Simmons' bold use of color, intricately detailed hand-cut stencils, sense of humor and thought-provoking narratives running through his work are proving Rich is both an innovator and highly collectible artist.

 

Simmons is also the creator and founder of Art Is The Cure, a vInspired award-winning organization promoting art therapy and has run workshops and talks around the world.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/cure-simmons-podcast

Dec 9, 2021
There is an urgency to making the work and getting it out there so that you can find the people who respond to it, but it becomes much harder to accomplish much of anything if your body aches from the physically demanding work you do, or your shoulders are tense from hunkering over the computer all afternoon, or you're living on caffeine and wine, or especially if you aren’t sleeping. If you want to improve your productivity, and your health, then it’s time to focus on your self-care.

What are you doing to take care of yourself? To keep up your energy, maintain a positive mindset, balance out the hours in the studio and on the computer? Is balance even necessary when you’re doing what you love?

In this episode of The Art Biz, I talk with Maria Coryell-Martin, a busy mom with a thriving art career and companion business that supports her family. With all that she has going on, Maria makes time for almost daily swims and cold, open water, healthy eating, and plenty of sleep. Listen to hear how she does it.

Highlights

  • Maria’s expeditionary art combines her passions for science, art and education. (2:20)

  • The motivation behind splitting Maria’s two artist endeavors. (4:57)

  • An income breakdown from Art Toolkit and Expeditionary Art. (7:44)

  • Maria’s art takes her all over the world. (10:31)

  • “I want to be a capable, useful person in the field.” (14:39)

  • How Maria successfully solicits funds for her expeditions. (17:17)

  • Self-care is the rock for Maria’s sanity. (19:25)

  • The physical aspect of making art requires taking care of your body. (24:06)

  • A typical day for Maria starts with getting enough sleep and swimming in the ocean. (28:21)

  • Monitoring energy levels, controlling what you’re eating, responding to stress. (35:15)

  • Setting boundaries around your time and energy. (40:57)

  • Getting the help you need so you can do your best work. (42:45)

  • The simple first steps for starting self-care today. (46:00)

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “Ask for what you need. You may not get it, but at least you’ll learn something.” — Maria Coryell Martin

  • “I’ve developed tools and habits over my life that are my rock for my sanity.” — Maria Coryell Martin

  • “Work is like a river. You dip your toes in and do what you can and then you take your toes out and it keeps flowing.” — Maria Coryell Martin

  • “Mistakes are part of everything you do, but you’ve just got to move forward and let mistakes happen.” — Maria Coryell Martin

Guest Bio

Maria Coryell-Martin is an expeditionary artist following the tradition of traveling artists as naturalists and educators. She graduated from Carleton College in 2004 and received a Thomas J. Watson fellowship to explore remote regions through art from 2004-2005.

Since then Maria has worked with scientists, local communities, and travelers in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and the Antarctic Peninsula. In the field, Coryell-Martin sketches with ink and watercolor, and collects multimedia recordings to build her palette of place, a record of experience, climate, and color. This led her to create the wildly popular Art Toolkit.

 

This work became the basis for exhibits of large-scale studio and field paintings, as well as multimedia presentations and hands-on workshops for audiences of all ages to promote observation, scientific inquiry, and environmental awareness.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/self-care-martin-podcast 

1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »