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The Art Biz

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist.
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Now displaying: June, 2021

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist. https://ArtBizSuccess.com/podcasts/

Jun 23, 2021
Who do you think you are?

If that thought has ever crossed your mind, this episode is for you. My guest is corporate-world-turned-full-time-artist Christa Forrest, and our topic is one that most of us experience at some point in our art careers and businesses: Imposter Syndrome.

Christa is a big advocate for "fake it til you make it," but that doesn't mean that she doesn't have doubts and insecurities. In this episode, you'll hear how Christa developed thick skin by showing her work at art festivals, why she is laser focused on building her email list, and how she overcomes feelings of inadequacy in her art practice.

Highlights

  • Christa Forrest describes the process of turning women into goddesses, and leaving her corporate job. (2:20)

  • Building an art business while preparing to quit your full-time job. (6:05)

  • Christa shares the income streams that allowed her to focus solely on her art. (10:56)

  • The tipping point — pinpointing your focus and selling your work. (13:23)

  • How to develop the thick skin that is required of serious artists. (17:29)

  • Tips for creating an online presence that makes more money. (21:05)

  • Imposter syndrome — what it means and where it’s most likely to appear in an artist’s world. (24:08)

  • Tools that will help you find the courage to fake it til you make it. (30:05)

  • Is imposter syndrome keeping you from making — and meeting — your goals? (33:42)

  • Overcoming the moment when imposter syndrome takes over. (41:44)

  • The support system that helps Christa stay grounded amidst her weaknesses. (44:14)

  • A look at what is keeping Christa’s attention in the studio now. (45:51)

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “I had to figure out what I have to offer and what problem do I have to solve out there before I started my actual business.” Christa Forrest

 

  • “It was really important to me at that time to be able to say ‘I’m an artist’.” — Christa Forrest

 

  • “If I can build my email list, I know I can build my income.” — Christa Forrest

 

  • “Failure is the only way we get better. We hardly ever learn from successes.” — Alyson Stanfield

About My Guest

Christa Forrest is an artist specializing in pastel, oil, acrylic and mixed media art. After spending 20 years in a finance career, she decided to follow her true passion and become a full-time artist. Christa spends her time sharing her passion with others, teaching others to be creative and exploring the world's landscape, recreating it onto canvas. Her work is a combination of realism, exploration, experimentation and pure fun.

 

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/imposter-syndrome-forrest-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Jun 17, 2021
Elitism in the art world is not an easy topic to tackleit’s something that I even grapple with. To help make sense of these complex issues, I’ve invited Megan Auman back to the podcast. Megan and I talk about what exactly the art world is and dive into problems that occur when entire groups of people are excluded from the art world (or art worlds, I believe). Elitism in this art world, the art world that is written about in newspaper reviews and whose artists are shown in museums and sold at auction is rampant, and that can be a real problem. Or is it?

In our conversation Megan and I unpack the many layers of elitism in the art world, from the traditional artist models that need to be permanently retired to the concern that too many artists are undervaluing and underpricing their work. There is a lot that needs to change, and this conversation is the perfect starting point for any artist who is interested in exploring and contributing to this difficult dialogue.

Highlights

  • Megan Auman shares the studio practice that evolved from her childhood artmaking. (2:19)

  • ‘This is the story that we’re not paying attention to.’ Is elitism running rampant in the art world? (4:52)

  • Megan defines the elite art world (with a capital A) and the inclusive artworld for the rest of us. (8:58)

  • The definition of art from 50 years ago just isn’t cutting it by today’s standards. (15:29)

  • A look at the many levels of elitism in the art world, and what exactly is wrong with all of them. (17:12)

  • What effect does the democratization of the art world have on the monetary value of an artist’s work? (23:54)

  • The importance of valuing what you make enough to be paid for that value. (25:54)

  • The basis of gender inequality in the art world. (27:45)

  • Defining elitism in the art world, why it’s worth ranting against, and what we can do about it. (28:40)

  • Reaching the point that you can confidently call yourself an artist and make your art truly accessible (not affordable). (35:00)

  • If anyone could be an artist, how can we differentiate the makers of the world and value what those makers make? (41:36)

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “When I talk about elitism in the art world, it’s not actually the art world that I inhabit.” Megan Auman

  • “There is this level of gatekeeping that happens and it’s a problem because only certain, very specific kinds of people get paid and supported in making their art.” Megan Auman

  • “It’s a matter of whether or not you believe that what you’re doing has enough value that you should be paid for that value.” Megan Auman

 

  • “What I want is for more people to claim what they do as art, and for us as a culture to value that art. Meaning that we put our money where our mouth is.” Megan Auman

 

  • “Calling yourself an artist does not preclude you from also spending money on other people’s art. Megan Auman

 

About My Guest

Megan Auman is an artist, metalsmith, teacher, writer, and business coach. She designs jewelry that is simultaneously bold and easy to wear. Though trained as a metalsmith, Megan draws endless inspiration from textiles and fashion, seeking to recreate the ease and fluidity of fiber and textiles in metal. She works predominantly in steel, forming each element and link by hand from wire, then torch welding each joint. Other welded metals, including silver and bronze, are sometimes used to add variety and contrast to her designs. Megan received a BFA in metals from Syracuse University and an MFA in metals and jewelry from Kent State University. While studying at Kent, she developed a love for working with steel and torch welding, which led to the development of her current line.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/elitism-auman-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Jun 10, 2021
Appearances shouldn’t matter, but we all know they do. We only have seconds to make a good first impression because, like it or not, people start forming an opinion of you from the moment they see you or your art, hear your voice or read something you’ve written. As much as I would love to focus solely on the presentation of my client’s work, I can’t avoid addressing the equally important aspect of the professional appearance of the artist themselves.

You are your brand, and with the ever-increasing emphasis to be seen on video and social media, it’s not only important that you look your best, it’s critical that you feel your best. Looking your best can help with feeling your best, and my guest today knows how to make sure that happens. Brooke Harker has been working with artists over the past year as the organizer of Saturday Night Live Art Shows. You’ll hear how, after some traumatic events, Brooke regained confidence with other people and in front of the camera with the help of a makeup lesson and a whole lot of interior work as well.

 

Highlights

  • ‘I make cityscapes that are portals into other worlds.’ Brooke Harker shares her work and updates from Saturday Night Live Art Shows. (2:27)

  • Face your fear of the camera by focusing on the fun. (7:16)

  • Looking confident as an artist does not start with emphasizing your looks. (11:50)

  • Making a 180-degree shift by focusing on the internal first. (16:09)

  • ‘See yourself as a beautiful piece of art — you are a blank canvas.’ (21:52)

  • Brooke shares the routine that helps her feel prepared for anything. (24:16)

  • Refocusing your attention on others starts with taking care of yourself. (29:10)

  • The benefits of being seen as an artist, and sharing rather than hiding. (32:00)

  • Telling your story is shaping the future of art history. (36:30)

  • Finding the courage to take the first step to feeling your best inside and out. (37:35)

  • Everyone sees you and hears you, so figure out how to own it. (40:55)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I had a sense of purpose that was bigger than, ‘how do I feel and what’s comfortable for me?’” Brooke Harker

  • “If a person says, ‘I’ll do it when I feel comfortable, I’ll do it when I feel confident, then they might not do it. You’ve just got to do it anyway.” Brooke Harker

  • “It’s definitely possible to be in a very low place and shift to a higher energy, more positive place. We get to choose which place we’re in.” Brooke Harker

  • “See yourself as a beautiful piece of art you are a blank canvas.” Samina Malik

  • “There’s a clarity that comes with sharing that doesn’t come with hiding.” Brooke Harker

 

About My Guest

Brooke Harker is a contemporary artist based in Los Angeles, California. Her lively paintings of cities and coastal scenes are characterized by energetic brushstrokes in ink and thick oil paint applied with palette knives. These vibrant depictions of daily life capture a sense of motion and highlight moments of synchronicity. Harker calls herself a historian of the ordinary. Her paintings are a collaboration with all of the people who’ve contributed to a place over time: architects, engineers, city workers who’ve placed street signs and pedestrians whose colorful fashion landed in view at the perfect moment. All of their individual actions brought together one moment, fated to be captured on canvas. Follow Brooke on Instagram: @brookeharker.

First posted: http://artbizsuccess.com/see-yourself-harker-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Jun 3, 2021
At what point do you get to call yourself an artist? What do you need to have achieved in order to earn that title? It's not an easy question to answer, and too many of my clients think they need to be working as a full-time artist before they can officially assume the title. Until that point, they are teachers, marketing agents, engineers, and doctors. However, there is no magic point when someone else is officially going to bestow the title of artist upon you.  

To help you determine what makes you an official artist, I’m joined today by abstract painter James Holmes. James is sharing three criteria that he created before he could call himself an artist, and he makes it clear that owning the title isn’t quite as complicated as it may seem. 

Highlights

 

  • The horseback riding accident that set James on the artist path. (3:41)

 

  • Connections in the art world encouraged James to continue making art. (10:51)

 

  • The day job that doubles as James’s other passion. (12:10)
  • When is the right time to start professionalizing your art and calling yourself an artist?  (14:31)
  • James’ initial response to being called an artist. (22:16)
  • Three criteria that James created before he would call himself an artist. (26:32)
  • How to be true to and satisfied with the work you make, even amidst criticism. (28:25)
  • The moment that James’s art was acknowledged by an established artist. (35:20)
  • Selling a piece to someone who doesn’t know you beyond your art. (39:10)
  • A look at the work that is keeping James busy now. (42:20)

 

 

 

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I had to figure out what being an artist means. When do I think I’ve achieved that?” James Holmes
  • “It was a lesson that was well learned. It turned out to take me to another level of my creativity.” James Holmes
  • “That night it all manifested because I believed in the art enough to exhibit it.” James Holmes



About My Guest

James Holmes is a Denver-based visual artist. As an abstract painter James shared, "I paint from the inside out. I believe painting from the inside out allows me to outwardly communicate my inner life. Everything I internalize, the experiences I have, the people in my life, my hopes, dreams, and faith are all reflected from heart, mind, and soul through the prism of my intuitive lenses resulting in artistic expressions utilizing a variety of media." James maintains a studio in Denver’s Golden Triangle arts district, and exhibits at the Veterans Arts Council Gallery, Centura Health Healing Gallery, and other venues. James is a Trustee of the Denver Art Museum and Executive Director of the Cherokee Ranch & Castle Foundation.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/artist-mindset-holmes-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

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