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Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist.
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Now displaying: Page 3

Looking for art career inspiration and ideas while you’re working in the studio or schlepping your art across the country? Alyson Stanfield helps you be a more productive artist, a more empowered artist, and a more successful artist. https://ArtBizSuccess.com/podcasts/

Jun 17, 2021
Elitism in the art world is not an easy topic to tackleit’s something that I even grapple with. To help make sense of these complex issues, I’ve invited Megan Auman back to the podcast. Megan and I talk about what exactly the art world is and dive into problems that occur when entire groups of people are excluded from the art world (or art worlds, I believe). Elitism in this art world, the art world that is written about in newspaper reviews and whose artists are shown in museums and sold at auction is rampant, and that can be a real problem. Or is it?

In our conversation Megan and I unpack the many layers of elitism in the art world, from the traditional artist models that need to be permanently retired to the concern that too many artists are undervaluing and underpricing their work. There is a lot that needs to change, and this conversation is the perfect starting point for any artist who is interested in exploring and contributing to this difficult dialogue.

Highlights

  • Megan Auman shares the studio practice that evolved from her childhood artmaking. (2:19)

  • ‘This is the story that we’re not paying attention to.’ Is elitism running rampant in the art world? (4:52)

  • Megan defines the elite art world (with a capital A) and the inclusive artworld for the rest of us. (8:58)

  • The definition of art from 50 years ago just isn’t cutting it by today’s standards. (15:29)

  • A look at the many levels of elitism in the art world, and what exactly is wrong with all of them. (17:12)

  • What effect does the democratization of the art world have on the monetary value of an artist’s work? (23:54)

  • The importance of valuing what you make enough to be paid for that value. (25:54)

  • The basis of gender inequality in the art world. (27:45)

  • Defining elitism in the art world, why it’s worth ranting against, and what we can do about it. (28:40)

  • Reaching the point that you can confidently call yourself an artist and make your art truly accessible (not affordable). (35:00)

  • If anyone could be an artist, how can we differentiate the makers of the world and value what those makers make? (41:36)

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “When I talk about elitism in the art world, it’s not actually the art world that I inhabit.” Megan Auman

  • “There is this level of gatekeeping that happens and it’s a problem because only certain, very specific kinds of people get paid and supported in making their art.” Megan Auman

  • “It’s a matter of whether or not you believe that what you’re doing has enough value that you should be paid for that value.” Megan Auman

 

  • “What I want is for more people to claim what they do as art, and for us as a culture to value that art. Meaning that we put our money where our mouth is.” Megan Auman

 

  • “Calling yourself an artist does not preclude you from also spending money on other people’s art. Megan Auman

 

About My Guest

Megan Auman is an artist, metalsmith, teacher, writer, and business coach. She designs jewelry that is simultaneously bold and easy to wear. Though trained as a metalsmith, Megan draws endless inspiration from textiles and fashion, seeking to recreate the ease and fluidity of fiber and textiles in metal. She works predominantly in steel, forming each element and link by hand from wire, then torch welding each joint. Other welded metals, including silver and bronze, are sometimes used to add variety and contrast to her designs. Megan received a BFA in metals from Syracuse University and an MFA in metals and jewelry from Kent State University. While studying at Kent, she developed a love for working with steel and torch welding, which led to the development of her current line.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/elitism-auman-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Jun 10, 2021
Appearances shouldn’t matter, but we all know they do. We only have seconds to make a good first impression because, like it or not, people start forming an opinion of you from the moment they see you or your art, hear your voice or read something you’ve written. As much as I would love to focus solely on the presentation of my client’s work, I can’t avoid addressing the equally important aspect of the professional appearance of the artist themselves.

You are your brand, and with the ever-increasing emphasis to be seen on video and social media, it’s not only important that you look your best, it’s critical that you feel your best. Looking your best can help with feeling your best, and my guest today knows how to make sure that happens. Brooke Harker has been working with artists over the past year as the organizer of Saturday Night Live Art Shows. You’ll hear how, after some traumatic events, Brooke regained confidence with other people and in front of the camera with the help of a makeup lesson and a whole lot of interior work as well.

 

Highlights

  • ‘I make cityscapes that are portals into other worlds.’ Brooke Harker shares her work and updates from Saturday Night Live Art Shows. (2:27)

  • Face your fear of the camera by focusing on the fun. (7:16)

  • Looking confident as an artist does not start with emphasizing your looks. (11:50)

  • Making a 180-degree shift by focusing on the internal first. (16:09)

  • ‘See yourself as a beautiful piece of art — you are a blank canvas.’ (21:52)

  • Brooke shares the routine that helps her feel prepared for anything. (24:16)

  • Refocusing your attention on others starts with taking care of yourself. (29:10)

  • The benefits of being seen as an artist, and sharing rather than hiding. (32:00)

  • Telling your story is shaping the future of art history. (36:30)

  • Finding the courage to take the first step to feeling your best inside and out. (37:35)

  • Everyone sees you and hears you, so figure out how to own it. (40:55)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I had a sense of purpose that was bigger than, ‘how do I feel and what’s comfortable for me?’” Brooke Harker

  • “If a person says, ‘I’ll do it when I feel comfortable, I’ll do it when I feel confident, then they might not do it. You’ve just got to do it anyway.” Brooke Harker

  • “It’s definitely possible to be in a very low place and shift to a higher energy, more positive place. We get to choose which place we’re in.” Brooke Harker

  • “See yourself as a beautiful piece of art you are a blank canvas.” Samina Malik

  • “There’s a clarity that comes with sharing that doesn’t come with hiding.” Brooke Harker

 

About My Guest

Brooke Harker is a contemporary artist based in Los Angeles, California. Her lively paintings of cities and coastal scenes are characterized by energetic brushstrokes in ink and thick oil paint applied with palette knives. These vibrant depictions of daily life capture a sense of motion and highlight moments of synchronicity. Harker calls herself a historian of the ordinary. Her paintings are a collaboration with all of the people who’ve contributed to a place over time: architects, engineers, city workers who’ve placed street signs and pedestrians whose colorful fashion landed in view at the perfect moment. All of their individual actions brought together one moment, fated to be captured on canvas. Follow Brooke on Instagram: @brookeharker.

First posted: http://artbizsuccess.com/see-yourself-harker-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Jun 3, 2021
At what point do you get to call yourself an artist? What do you need to have achieved in order to earn that title? It's not an easy question to answer, and too many of my clients think they need to be working as a full-time artist before they can officially assume the title. Until that point, they are teachers, marketing agents, engineers, and doctors. However, there is no magic point when someone else is officially going to bestow the title of artist upon you.  

To help you determine what makes you an official artist, I’m joined today by abstract painter James Holmes. James is sharing three criteria that he created before he could call himself an artist, and he makes it clear that owning the title isn’t quite as complicated as it may seem. 

Highlights

 

  • The horseback riding accident that set James on the artist path. (3:41)

 

  • Connections in the art world encouraged James to continue making art. (10:51)

 

  • The day job that doubles as James’s other passion. (12:10)
  • When is the right time to start professionalizing your art and calling yourself an artist?  (14:31)
  • James’ initial response to being called an artist. (22:16)
  • Three criteria that James created before he would call himself an artist. (26:32)
  • How to be true to and satisfied with the work you make, even amidst criticism. (28:25)
  • The moment that James’s art was acknowledged by an established artist. (35:20)
  • Selling a piece to someone who doesn’t know you beyond your art. (39:10)
  • A look at the work that is keeping James busy now. (42:20)

 

 

 

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

Quotes

  • “I had to figure out what being an artist means. When do I think I’ve achieved that?” James Holmes
  • “It was a lesson that was well learned. It turned out to take me to another level of my creativity.” James Holmes
  • “That night it all manifested because I believed in the art enough to exhibit it.” James Holmes



About My Guest

James Holmes is a Denver-based visual artist. As an abstract painter James shared, "I paint from the inside out. I believe painting from the inside out allows me to outwardly communicate my inner life. Everything I internalize, the experiences I have, the people in my life, my hopes, dreams, and faith are all reflected from heart, mind, and soul through the prism of my intuitive lenses resulting in artistic expressions utilizing a variety of media." James maintains a studio in Denver’s Golden Triangle arts district, and exhibits at the Veterans Arts Council Gallery, Centura Health Healing Gallery, and other venues. James is a Trustee of the Denver Art Museum and Executive Director of the Cherokee Ranch & Castle Foundation.

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/artist-mindset-holmes-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

May 27, 2021
I get tons of podcast pitches, but none have been better than the one I recently received from Lilianne Milgrom. It was right on target. Lilianne had just finished writing a book, and, while I was skeptical, her pitch was perfect. I gave her book a go and could not put it down. It contained art history, intrigue, sex, and scandal. How could it not be fascinating?

But my conversation today with Lilianne isn't only about the book. It's the story of how the book came to be which is a lesson in itself and has its roots in her decision to be a copyist at the Musee d'Orsay in Paris, copying Courbet's scandalous painting, L'Origine du Monde (The Origin of the World). She learned valuable lessons, exercised her courage muscle, and became a better artist as a result. The experience led to the writing of the book that so engrossed me. Lilianne and I talk about all of that and how she juggles her art and writing. She also shares tips for pitching to podcasts, which are equally valuable for other media pitches.

Highlights

 

  • Lilianne shares the timeline of her artist journey. (3:22)

  • The difference between a consistent studio practice and making consistent work. (5:56)

  • The premise and genesis of Lilianne’s book L'Origine. (9:15)

  • A full list of Lilianne’s reasons not to become a copyist of this scandalous painting. (13:08)

  • The fascinating rules for being a copyist at the Musée d’Orsay. (16:36)

  • Overcoming the most uncomfortable aspects of this endeavor, including the unsolicited comments from museum visitors. (20:21)

  • Main differences between male and female reactions to the painting. (25:43)

  • The inspiration that comes from writing about your painting. (26:55)

  • Turning a once-in-a-lifetime artist experience and the painting that provided it into a novel. (29:40)

  • What makes a piece of art timeless and relevant? (35:13)

  • If this artwork is shocking today, imagine how it was received in the 1800s. (40:20)

  • Lilianne explains why her copy of L'Origine du Monde is not currently on display. (42:12)

  • Lessons learned from interacting with such famous and controversial artwork. (43:38)

  • What does Lilianne’s studio practice look like now? (46:43)

  • The secret to pitching your idea in a way that gets results. (48:10)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

Quotes

 

  • “Writing is like painting with words.” Lilianne Milgrom

  • “This painting gave me the sense of empowerment, which at the beginning felt like an embarrassment, and it turned out to be this enormous feeling of liberation and empowerment.” Lilianne Milgrom

  • “This certainly changed my life. As far as my art, it's made me fairly fearless.” Lilianne Milgrom

  • “The written word and art, they can’t be separated because you’re going to need to express yourself.” Lilianne Milgrom

 

About My Guest

Lilianne Milgrom was born in Paris, grew up in Australia, and currently resides in the United States. Milgrom holds two degrees from Melbourne University and an associate art degree from the Academy of Art in San Francisco. She exhibits her artwork around the world and is the recipient of multiple awards. In 2011, she became the first authorized copyist of Gustave Courbet's controversial painting L'Origine du Monde (The Origin of the World), which hangs in the Orsay Museum in Paris and draws over a million visitors a year. After rendering a near-identical copy of Courbet's masterpiece, she spent close to a decade researching and writing L'Origine.

May 20, 2021
Collaborations aren't for the faint of heart—especially for artists who are used to working alone and making decisions without having to get approval from another human being. But my guests today have figured out how to make it work.

In this episode I talk with Rebecca Crowell and Jerry McLaughlin about how their Cold Wax Academy got off the ground. They were my guests way back in episode 9 from 2017 when we discussed the publication of their book, Cold Wax Medium. Their collaboration has only deepened since that time, and in this interview you’ll find out what makes their combined efforts work so well.

Rebecca, Jerry, and I discuss the format of Cold Wax Academy, how they make decisions together, how they find new members, and what they would do differently with the benefit of hindsight. We also talk about one of my very favorite topics—systems—and the technology they use to keep their joint venture going.

Highlights

  • Rebecca and Jerry reflect on the timeline of their collaboration. (2:37)

  • Rebranding your business with the help of professionals. (6:18)

  • Making the transition from live teaching to the online Cold Wax Academy. (11:04)

  • Replacing income lost from cancelled live workshops. (12:37)

  • The pandemic-induced “oh crap” moment that changed everything. (17:03)

  • How to know when it’s time to hire help. (20:19)

  • Collaborating with another person in every important aspect of your business. (24:08)

  • Tools that maximize your communication efforts. (26:53)

  • A high level overview of the offerings of Cold Wax Academy. (29:00)

  • The key to making a paid membership work. (33:57)

  • How to determine what content to offer for free and what to charge for. (37:58)

  • Adjusting your offerings starts with knowing what your audience wants. (38:47)

  • A look at the numbers of the Cold Wax Academy community. (43:37)

  • Lessons learned from the timing and building of a business. (45:34)

  • What’s coming up next for Cold Wax Academy. (49:42)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/collaborating-coldwax-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

 

 

Quotes

  • “We have this great collaboration and I couldn’t have known ahead of time how exciting it would be to develop this program.” Rebecca Crowell

  • “Hiring a third person has given us more energy to devote to the business itself.” Jerry McLaughlin

  • “What we produce is infinitely better because we’re both doing it together.” Jerry McLaughlin

  • “As we go we’re learning more and more about how to interact with people and how to involve members.” Rebecca Crowell

 

About My Guests

Rebecca Crowell has been a professional artist for thirty years and is widely known for her innovative painting techniques involving cold wax medium and oils. She teaches these methods both in the US and internationally. Her work is handled by fine art galleries in Chicago, Atlanta, Milwaukee, Telluride, and Dublin, Ireland and is found in hundreds of private, public, and corporate collections. Rebecca holds an MFA in Painting and lives in rural west-central Wisconsin.

Jerry McLaughlin has been a working visual artist for twenty years and has exhibited at galleries throughout the U.S. His work is in collections around the world. An expert in all things cold wax, he focuses his major energies on painting, teaching, and writing. Trained as a pediatric intensive care physician, he also holds a certificate in adult education from the University of Washington. Jerry lives in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico.

 

May 13, 2021
This month we're exploring the topic of adjusting your approach, whether it’s making little tweaks, looking at new possibilities, or even turning your art business and career upside down. My guest today proves that making these adjustments can give us better results or maybe just make us happier.

Kelly M. O'Brien has been selling a lot of work since 2015, in a way that surprised her at the time. And while she has continued that work, she has added new work—what she calls emerging work— since deciding to go back to graduate school in 2017 to earn her MFA.

With such great commercial success it seemed like an unusual time to return to grad school, but now that she has been out of school for over a year, Kelly is ready to talk about her decision to take that big step and what she learned in the process. Join our conversation as we talk about the ins and outs of juggling two very different art businesses, what her daily practice is like, and where her work is headed.

Highlights

  • Kelly M. O’Brien shares her art path and the works that have gone viral. (1:49)

  • Finding more meaning and depth in your art. (5:47)

  • Changing the focus of her work resulted in Kelly creating two different practices. (8:08)

  • Finding the right time and the right approach to return to graduate school. (11:51)

  • The value of intentional planning sessions to help you grow as an artist. (17:15)

  • The biggest benefits of returning to school. (20:02)

  • How to determine if an MFA is right for your career. (23:45)

  • Balancing money-making ventures with your education. (24:49)

  • How to respond to the stigma surrounding serious artists who work to make money. (26:27)

  • Changes in Kelly’s practice as a result of earning her MFA. (28:32)

  • A look inside Kelly’s approach to her daily practice in the studio. (31:04)

  • Learning a visual vocabulary that will shape the statement of your work. (34:47)

  • Kelly shares an overview of what is holding her attention in her studio. (38:18)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

About My Guest

Kelly M. O’Brien is an American mixed-media sculptor who lives and works near Bristol, England. She completed a Master of Fine Art (Distinction) at Bath Spa University in 2019. Kelly is co-founder of A Gathering of Unasked Possibility, a collaborative project fostering active hope through creative practitioners, and runs PaperJoy Studio, offering bespoke paper art originals and hand-embellished prints for hospitality and important residential projects.

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/mfa-obrien-podcast 

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Apr 22, 2021
The idea of letting go of something that is safe but isn’t contributing to the life you want to live can be a very scary one. But my guest today has proven that cleaning out in order to follow your dreams just might be the best thing you could do for your art business.

Lea K. Tawd did some of my favorite kind of cleaning out last year. She cleaned out obligations and associations that were taking her away from the work she was meant to do in this world, and the payoffs increase as her income streams multiply. She unlocked the secrets to a more abundant money mindset.

In our conversation Lea and I talked about what she eliminated in 2020 that allowed her to dive deeper into her creativity and step into her art business more fully. We discuss the book she wrote, how she structures her days as a mom with a 6-year-old who has to show up for the virtual classroom, and how she quickly replaced the income from an outside source she had been holding onto out of fear.

Highlights

  • Lea K. Tawd shares her journey in art, motherhood, and self-care. (1:57)

  • Getting back on track when you’re feeling off-centered. (6:02)

  • Lea recounts the various income streams of her pre-pandemic artwork. (11:10)

  • What happens when you stop doing the work that you are afraid to let go of? (14:40)

  • How to clean out old obligations in order to turn your ideas into an income stream. (17:44)

  • Creating spaces, rituals and schedules that will increase your energy. (21:19)

  • Lea shares the ways that increasing her focus has also increased her income. (23:50)

  • Advice for letting go of an income stream that you don’t love. (27:58)

  • How to overcome a big, scary thing so that you can do the work you want to do most. (29:26)

  • Cultivating the relationships that will support you through the hardest times. (33:17)

  • Lea shares what is currently holding her attention in the studio. (34:27)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

About My Guest

Lea K. Tawd is an author, mixed media artist and Reiki master teacher. She seeks out the beauty in every woman and uses that vision to create mixed media art that inspires and heals. The finished pieces are a Utopian vision of inner beauty manifested that serve as a reminder to take care of yourself, to find moments of peace, kindness, and self-love. Lea often paints directly on wood, so the wood grains help to inform the finished piece. As a Reiki Master Lea uses Reiki in the creation of her art and combines the two to help others find deep inner healing and recover their creativity in private sessions, workshops, and retreats.

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/money-breakthrough-tawd-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

 

Apr 8, 2021
This month we’re focusing on the benefits of cleaning out — from physical clutter to organizing your lives, eliminating obligations that are no longer serving you to slowing down enough to focus on what matters most, in your art business and in your life. Kelly Milukas has been through more in the last 10 years than anyone should have to endure, and yet she never lost hope and determination.

Kelly and I scheduled our conversation to discuss her "life edit," which involved getting rid of what no longer served her. It quickly became apparent that ridding herself of stuff when she had to downsize her studio is something she had been preparing herself for in the many years leading up to that moment.

This conversation is about coming out on the other side of a long struggle stronger than you were previously. Join us as we celebrate the triumph of one artist's positive spirit, discover the tools she used to facilitate the process, and hear about the people she relied on along the way.

Highlights

  • Kelly Milukas reflects on her journey from athletics to music and to art. (1:57)

  • Kelly works with scientists and starts researching stem cells for a commission for a biopharmaceutical company. (8:30)

  • A shift in health can create a shift in focus for any artist. (12:15)

  • Embracing the tools that are available to you can help you get through anything. (16:52)

  • Forging through the messy middle to come out stronger on the other side. (21:26)

  • Can 17 seconds or a deeper breath change your mindset? (25:23)

  • How to know when to power through and when to pull back. (28:55)

  • The power of giving yourself permission to feel your biggest emotions. (32:48)

  • Cleaning out physical objects to move your art business forward. (34:50)

  • Creating an organized studio that works for you on any budget. (41:10)

  • A look inside all that is keeping Kelly busy in her new studio. (45:00)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/stronger-milukas-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Apr 1, 2021
Spring is here in the Northern Hemisphere and it’s a perfect time to consider the aspects of your life that are weighing you down without contributing to your happiness and success. April is the month for cleaning out in the Art Biz Success community. In this episode, I’m highlighting some of my previous interviews with artists who have discussed cleaning out in one form or another, from removing physical items to cleaning out business ideas and strategies, modes of working, and even the venues where you show and sell your art.

If you are ready to deep clean your art business, to release what isn’t serving you and banish all that is getting in the way of your productivity and creativity, then you won’t want to miss the insights and inspiration from these successful artists.

Highlights

 

  • April is the month to focus on cleaning out your art business. (0:01)

  • Is there one single best way to get organized? Heather Powers says no. (2:23)

  • Tips to help you get started on cleaning out and organizing your spaces. (6:09)

  • Redefining your relationship with things so that you can let go. (10:41)

  • How to prepare your studio for a big move. (14:50)

  • Take control of your business so that it works for you, even if it means emptying out your galleries. (19:16)

  • Control your income by controlling your inventory. (23:29)

  • Connecting with buyers outside of the galleries. (27:02)

  • Releasing old work so you can focus on what is most meaningful. (28:21)

  • Increasing your creativity begins with cleaning out the cobwebs. (34:32)

 

Mentioned

Resources

 

 

Mar 25, 2021
If you’re an intentional artist, you’re in the right place. In this episode, I'm wrapping up a month of talking about how systems can keep you organized and make you a more productive artist.

Today’s solo episode focuses on the secret weapon of a successful art business your art biz handbook. An art biz handbook is the number one way to organize every aspect of your business. If you’re looking for ways to stay on top of the never-ending tasks that every artist faces, this episode is for you. You’ll hear the step-by-step process that will keep you in control of every aspect of your schedule, how I have evolved systems that weren’t working for me, and the satisfaction, productivity, and control that you can come to expect from an art biz handbook that is working for you.

Highlights

  • An overview of the value of a high-quality, clearly defined art business system. (0:01)

  • Documenting your systems why you need an art biz handbook. (2:07)

  • Your system doesn’t have to be perfect to be effective. (4:56)

  • Steps that will make your systems more reliable. (6:12)

  • Practical examples of systems that have simplified processes in my art business. (9:01)

  • How to prioritize the process of capturing your procedures. (10:11)

  • Why your art biz handbook will never be finished. (12:35)

Mentioned

Resources

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/art-biz-procedures-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Mar 18, 2021
Betty Franks loves her business and life as an artist. She just might have found the secret sauce — a healthy combination of passion for the work and a continuing curiosity about business and becoming a better CEO of your art business. Betty's art business has exploded over the last four years — by 440%. You can't have and sustain this kind of business growth if you don't have solid systems in place.

At the time of this recording, Betty has over 120,000 Instagram followers and sells paintings almost as fast as she makes them. In this episode, we discuss the digital and analog systems that she depends on to support her growth. She generously shares her real numbers, the new postage system she just started using, her daily and weekly routines, and how she organizes all of the digital images of her paintings.

Highlights

  • Betty Franks shares the moment she fell in love with mixed media and decided to start her art career. (2:20)

  • How to find your own style and way of making art. (7:20)

  • Staying organized through the process of handling a personal and business name change. (12:25)

  • Betty shares her business goals that resulted in a 400% increase in sales. (18:20)

  • A breakdown of Betty’s income streams and marketing tools. (21:03)

  • How to know when it’s time to hire help for your art business. (28:13)

  • Developing routines that stabilize your creative and practical routines. (31:10)

  • Simple systems to help manage your inventory. (35:25)

  • Building an email list that works for your business. (42:55)

  • How to know when it’s time to make process changes for the better. (47:37)

  • A look at what is keeping Betty’s attention in the studio. (52:24)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

About My Guest

Betty Franks was born in Toronto, Canada and raised in San Jose, California. She is a self-taught abstract artist who started painting when she turned 50. Although it seems late in life to take up painting, the timing was just right for her. After a long career in customer service management, Franks was ready to unleash her creative side. Today her work focuses on her love of fields of flowers and flowers in general. She aims to share the emotion she feels about her subject.

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/managing-growth-franks-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Mar 11, 2021
As much as every artist would love to focus only on the making, there is an equally important and opposite side of the artist brain that needs to be accessed — the organization side. It takes creativity and organization to successfully run an art business, and my guest today has learned how to embrace both.

Not only is Jennifer Printz a practicing artist with an enviable record of exhibitions, but she's also an assistant professor at Florida International University in Miami. She has two full-time jobs. I've watched Jennifer whip her business into shape by getting organized and creating reliable systems.

In this episode, I talk with her about how she compartmentalizes her two jobs. We also discuss the planning process she uses, the digital and paper tools she relies on to stay organized, and why writing by hand is critical for her and her students.

Highlights

  • Jennifer Printz reflects on the wide variety of her artwork and her work as a professor. (2:02)

  • The importance of modeling art for Jennifer’s students and the lessons they are learning as a result. (5:53)

  • Practical tips for separating your day job from your art business. (8:40)

  • The value of taking time for an artist’s day, connecting with artists virtually, and creating physical space for your creativity. (11:33)

  • Taking your art business beyond the plateau to the next level with coaching and positive feedback. (16:50)

  • Planning out a quarter at a time to free up your mental space for creativity. (22:30)

  • Day-to-day systems that will help you get and stay organized and productive. (27:21)

  • Jennifer’s process around keeping an updated inventory of her pieces. (33:42)

  • Strategic organization of all the moving parts of an exhibition. (38:29)

  • Playing into your personality strengths to maximize your art business systems. (42:35)

  • What is the first step to take when your systems are breaking down? (45:04)

  • A look inside the works that are currently holding Jennifer’s studio attention. (47:12)

Mentioned

Resources

Quotes

  • “When I hit a certain level of success I felt the need to get a more objective viewpoint to help me move to a new level of success.” Jennifer Printz

  • “If we’re always doing what we’ve always done and the results are what we always got, then it’s time to reevaluate.” Jennifer Printz

  • “It made sense to shift to a new system so I could put more effort into my creative practice.” Jennifer Printz

  • “In order to build strong relationships, in order to have a successful exhibition, I need to access other parts of me and not let the part of me that’s against organization get in the way.” Jennifer Printz

 

About My Guest

Jennifer Printz unifies photography and drawing to make poetic works that reflect the unseen structures of the universe. In 2004 she was awarded a Puffin Foundation Grant, followed by a Dendo Fellowship in 2016. She has participated in regular residencies in the US, at the Frans Masereel Centre/Flemish Center for the Graphic Arts in Kasterlee, Belgium, St. James Cavalier Centre for Creativity, Valletta, Malta, and La Cité Internationale des Arts, Paris, France.

Jennifer is also an educator, teaching a wide range of two-dimensional media at the undergraduate and graduate levels, as well as courses on public art and professional practices. Currently, she is on the faculty of Florida International University in Miami.

First posted: https://artbizsuccess.com/biz-tools-printz-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Mar 4, 2021
If you’ve been listening to this podcast for any amount of time, you know that I am the queen of systems. There is a reason that my signature program is the Art Career Success SYSTEM. I have learned that when you take the time to put in place easily repeatable steps to do a certain task or implement a project, the rewards are endless. You free your mind and calendar for the more creative pursuits of the studio. You have a better-organized business and life. Your consistency increases, as does the trust that others have in you.

Creating a streamlined art business system isn’t hard, it just takes dedicated time.

In this solo episode, I want to help you get started. I’m sharing three powerful benefits to implementing solid systems into your art business and five questions that you need to ask yourself when creating that better system. And to help you see that systems work, I’ll tell you about a few artists who have created systems that work. It worked for them, and I can promise the time you spend on your systems will be worth it as your creativity and productivity in your art business continue to increase.

Highlights

  • The why behind effective art business systems. (0:01)

  • Understanding the ecosystem and metasystems within your art business. (2:10)

  • Three clear benefits of installing systems in your art business. (3:35)

  • Five questions to ask yourself when implementing a new system. (5:50)

  • How to clearly define what you want to see happen. (6:38)

  • Clear timelines create clear results (7:01)

  • What tools and technology do you need to acquire to create your system? (7:26)

  • Who can assist you in meeting your goals? (8:13)

  • What are the exact steps needed to make your system hum? (8:34)

  • Upcoming podcast guest artists who have successfully implemented systems into their art business. (9:11)

  • A homework assignment to get you started with your new system. (9:51)

  • All that the Art Career Success System can offer your art business. (10:58)

Mentioned

Resources

 

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/organize-with-systems-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Feb 25, 2021
I don't know anyone who doesn't think it would be great to attract more Instagram followers, more email list subscribers, and especially more sales. More makes our efforts feel worthwhile and validates them, but we're often stopped in our tracks when we begin to realize what we need to do in order to increase our numbers.

We think we have to post more, research hashtags, invest in advertising, create a lead magnet, learn to write better copy, or forget about a restful night's sleep. It’s true that you probably do have to do some of those things in order to attract more followers and subscribers, but you might also benefit from being open to doing things a little differently to increase those numbers.

In this episode, I talk with Trudy Rice about how she has grown her Instagram and email list by cross-promoting other brands. Trudy uses a platform called Ampjar, but the underlying lesson is to find like-minded people and share each other's art, products, and services. Trudy refers to this as “shouting them out,” and in our conversation, she highlights what it takes to get set up with the service, and how it has impacted her success in a major way.

Highlights

  • Trudy Rice details her Australian flora and fauna art, teaching, and other current projects. (2:13)

  • Taking original prints and paintings to a homewares line. (4:28)

  • Quantifying the growth of a successful art business through a variety of income streams. (6:18)

  • The primary systems and marketing channels Trudy uses for her sales. (8:25)

  • Details about the Ampjar mailing system and the karmic aspect to shout-outs. (11:37)

  • The algorithms behind the Ampjar shout-out system. (13:57)

  • How to systematically simplify the process of promoting your business. (17:39)

  • Prompting other artists while promoting yourself. (21:16)

  • The variety of brands that Trudy promotes through Ampjar. (22:18)

  • How to connect with new and international audiences through shout-outs. (23:57)

  • Tracking the success that has come by integrating new systems. (26:08)

  • The importance of collaborating with other artists with any system that works. (29:23)

  • How to do the work once and benefit from it over and over again. (30:17)

  • Trudy shares her project and collaboration plans for 2021. (33:35)

 

Mentioned

Resources

First posted: artbizsuccess.com/karma-rice-podcast

Let’s do this together: https://artbizsuccess.com/community

Music by https://wildermiss.com

Feb 18, 2021
I live to track down art off the beaten path — traveling to out-of-the-way places to see works of art that delight and inspire, or even confound me. I found just such a piece last year when I traveled to the Midwest, and the success story of the artist behind the art is just as engaging as the piece itself.

My guest for this episode is Romy Owens, an artist and curator who makes site-specific installations, as well as smaller objects, in reaction to place, community, and transformation. Last fall I had the opportunity to visit Under Her Wing was The Universe, her enormous public sculpture that was installed in 2020 in Enid, Oklahoma.

In this episode I talk with Romy about her commitment to raising $100,000 for that outdoor public sculpture and native prairie landscape as a gift to her hometown. As it turns out, $100,000 was just the beginning, and while it all worked out in the end, it wasn’t exactly easy getting there. Not only did Romy have to raise a lot more money than originally projected, she had to stand up to the naysayers in the community.

Romy is an artist that knows how to effectively measure success. Community collaboration, fundraising, overcoming controversy and yes, using spreadsheets are just a few of the topics that you won’t want to miss in this conversation.

 

Highlights

  • Romy Owens shares the leap of faith she has taken with her art and with her community. (3:30)

  • Conceiving the project Under Her Wing was the Universe. (9:55)

  • Relationships that informed the piece and Alyson’s reaction to seeing it in person. (12:10)

  • Naming the piece and finding value in all that is revealed in the universe. (16:06)

  • Securing space for the project and making the connections that brought city approval. (20:04)

  • Funding from the city and how Romy planned to cover the rest. (23:50)

  • Launching a GoFundMe fundraiser. (26:40)

  • Meeting tight deadlines and overcoming obstacles along the way. (28:26)

  • Overcome your fear of hearing “no” when raising funds. (30:33)

  • Handling the controversy that comes with creating interesting art. (33:02)

  • Key collaborators and supporters in creating a piece of this scale. (36:27)

  • Keeping track of your progress with a system that actually works. (41:09)

  • Measuring success and setting goals in specific and meaningful ways. (43:24)

  • Ideas for generating interest in your art. (49:32)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

About My Guest

Romy Owens is an artist and curator living in Enid, Oklahoma. She makes site-specific installations, as well as smaller objects, in reaction to place, community, and transformation. Her curatorial work attends to a similar focus. Both Owens' artistic and curatorial practices are presently centered around community art designed to impact social change, using art as a method to broaden our understanding of specific issues.

Feb 11, 2021
What is something special you can do for your subscribers and collectors when your shows and large events are canceled because of a pandemic? Give them a private viewing experience, of course.

This week, my guest is Simonne Roy, a contemporary American impressionist painter grounded in the plein air painting tradition. For years, Simonne has been inviting VIPs into her home, which she had transformed into a gallery, for a one-night party. The money and effort she invested in the event resulted in good sales and relationships. Each year's success built on that of previous years.

When Covid struck, her hopes for a successful home gallery show in 2020 were dashed, until, like many scrappy entrepreneurs, Simonne found a different way to make it happen. She decided to hold the VIP appreciation without the party.

In this episode, you'll hear how Simonne gave people a private experience that few people get to have with art, which she calls the Quiet Gallery Experience. If she measured its success by the amount of sales only, she could have counted it a success. But sales were almost secondary because Simonne measures her success by the goodwill she created with her subscribers and collectors.

Listen closely to hear what she did to set the stage and make it special, what she would do differently next time, and how she netted the same amount of money from the participation of fewer people.

Highlights

 

  • Simonne Roy shares the journey that led to her art business and her current income sources. (2:28)

  • Transforming a house into an intimate, personalized home gallery. (7:10)

  • The inspiration that saved Simonne’s gallery experience during Covid. (13:42)

  • How can greater vulnerability result in more meaningful connections? (20:05)

  • Scheduling a full day of showings and Simonne’s goal for each visitor. (21:51)

  • Preparing any space for a full gallery experience. (25:22)

  • Results from the gallery included sales, a teaching offer and increased connections. (29:29)

  • Reducing overhead for an event can still result in positive net sales. (34:10)

  • Marketing an event and creating a thoughtful gift for your customers. (36:14)

  • Simonne shares the lessons she learned for next time. (38:11)

  • A peek at what is holding Simonne’s attention in the studio now. (38:34)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

About My Guest

Simonne Roy describes herself as a contemporary American impressionist painter grounded in the plein air landscape painting tradition. She is also a Francophile, and has lived in France for extended periods over the years—adding quintessential French subjects such as pastries, breads, and cheeses to her nature-inspired paintings.

A lifelong resident of Pennsylvania, Roy lives in Lewisburg, where she maintains her studio and home gallery.

Feb 4, 2021
What is success? How do you measure it? What story do the numbers tell?

Confronting numbers can be intimidating, but it is an essential step to growing both yourself and your business. It forces you to be realistic about where you are, including your weaknesses, and it challenges you to make up for any lost ground.

This month we are looking into measuring success and today I want to share with you the tracking procedure that has helped grow my business by up to 40% every single year. I’ll share ideas to help get you started on your own monthly business report, highlight some of the fun and surprising areas you need to track (beyond just the sales) and tell you how to download a copy of a monthly report for your art business.

The numbers definitely won’t tell the whole story, but if you’re looking for an effective and telling way to measure your efforts, your satisfaction, and your success, this is the place to start.

Highlights

  • What numbers should you use to measure your success? (0:01)

  • How I learned the true value of being authentic in my business. (1:26)

  • The importance of confronting numbers when you’re ready to grow yourself and your business. (3:37)

  • The number one thing to include in your monthly business report. (5:12)

  • Report the monthly numbers and then find insights in them. (5:38)

  • The value of making cool connections every month. (6:53)

  • The most productive and enjoyable approaches to promoting and sharing your art each month. (8:30)

  • Upcoming interviews that will elaborate on the theme of measuring success. (10:22)

  • How to download and customize your own monthly art report. (11:58)

Mentioned

Resources

 

Jan 28, 2021
We all seek success (whatever it means to us individually) but aren’t always prepared to deal with it when it comes along. And that’s okay, because as you’ll hear in this episode, you will learn how to deal with unexpected success if it’s something you really want.

My guest is Lisa Goren, an artist whose work took a surprise U-turn when the pandemic hit last year, and she went for it.

Lisa Goren works in watercolor to show an unfamiliar landscape in a new light. By using vibrant colors and taking risks with different surfaces, she makes the viewer reevaluate their understanding of both the landscapes and their beliefs in the potential of the medium. Her works create questions about the nature of abstraction and our planet as many of her pieces are representations of unfamiliar, threatened terrains. More recently, Lisa has begun painting animals who had started showing up in unusual places during the pandemic.

​In our conversation, Lisa shares the artist residencies and serious work reflecting climate change that she was making before Covid hit. But when she was no longer able to travel to photograph and paint the wildlife and melting ice around Antarctica she turned her attention to the delightful animals that were visiting museums, aquariums and towns. Lisa shares her success dilemman: the new work was taking off and taking over. Her new journey is to regain control over where the work is headed while being open to whatever the future holds.

Highlights

  • Lisa Goren details the path and thick skin that led to her successful art business. (2:25)

  • Painting ice, bones, and deep blue colors in Antarctica, Alaska, and Iceland. (6:04)

  • The importance of creating artist support groups in your art business journey. (9:07)

  • Lisa reflects on the plans she had for 2020, how the pandemic changed it all, and the pivoting point that led to a new success. (12:17)

  • Inspiration can come from anywhere, including free roaming penguins in museums. (17:47)

  • Creating and pricing high-demand art that you didn’t intend to sell. (19:45)

  • Responding to a call for art during the pandemic created additional interest in Lisa’s work from The Washington Post. (22:16)

  • Handling the “problem” of success and why you might consider selling low-priced originals instead of prints. (26:45)

  • Making connections with buyers and offering hope through art. (31:24)

  • How to adjust your pricing to better control your schedule. (33:33)

  • Lisa details the assignment that led to her return to painting penguins. (34:41)

  • Transitioning from the artist you may be known as to the artist that you currently are. (36:54)

  • Lisa details her marketing channels, how she connects with the photographers that inspire her work, and whether she replaced her lost income in 2020. (40:31)

  • If the pandemic ended tomorrow, would Lisa continue painting animals? (45:24)

Mentioned

Resources

 

About My Guest

Lisa Goren was born in California and raised in NYC, and yet she has dreamed of Polar landscapes since she was in her teens. Her first trip took her to Antarctica where she was inspired and captivated by the landscape. Her watercolors show an unfamiliar landscape in a new light. By using vibrant colors and taking risks with different surfaces, she makes the viewer reevaluate their understanding of both these landscapes and their beliefs in the potential of the medium.

Jan 21, 2021
Taking charge of your art business isn’t only about bookkeeping, inventory and promoting your art effectively. Taking charge of your art business is about assuming 100% responsibility for your actions — all of your actions, especially in your studio. We all want to increase our productivity and creativity in this new year, and my guest today has mastered the art of doing exactly that by planning ahead.

Dawn Williams Boyd makes figurative textile paintings that reveal stories—not always pretty ones—about the American experience. Dawn’s work has an unapologetic socially activist message that speaks volumes about the Black experience and this country’s politics.

In today’s social and political climate, there aren’t enough hours in the day for Dawn to convey all of the messages she wants to share in her art. She has to carefully plan the body of work she is going to make throughout the year. She takes charge of her production for the entire year.

In our conversation, Dawn and I discuss her process for plotting out which pieces she will make each year. We also talk about why now is not the time to make art that matches the couch, conversations she wants people to have around her work, and how she makes the valuable connections that are helping her reach her most ambitious goals.

 

Highlights

  • Dawn Williams Boyd responds to her daughter’s statement that she is a righteous badass. (3:45)

  • Art that represents the effect of the history of the United States on the African American community, created by an African American woman. (6:14)

  • What interested Dawn most in her Art History class is reflected in her own work. (9:30)

  • Dawn reflects on the big plans that she had for exhibiting her work in 2020. (12:47)

  • The good things that can happen when you have nowhere to go and no one to see your work. (16:06)

  • “The List” and how it influences Dawn’s productivity and creativity every year. (18:02)

  • Now is not the time to make art that matches the couch. Dawn explains the opportunity of artists to use their voice to influence others. (21:32)

  • A look inside Dawn’s notebook, including the details, fabrics, facts and titles that drive her work. (26:15)

  • Questions that Dawn asks herself in the planning stage of each new piece. (31:10)

  • The criteria that guides Dawn’s ability to set goals and plan her work out a year in advance. (34:10)

  • Dawn reflects on her 2020 goals, the pieces that she actually created and how she is constantly preparing for what is coming next. (36:50)

  • What kind of conversations does Dawn want people to have around her work? (43:50)

  • Understanding the worldwide problems that are depicted in the imagery in Dawn’s piece, All Through the Night: America’s Homeless. (48:03)

  • The overarching business and career goals that guide Dawn’s work every single day. (53:10)

  • How can an ambitious artist ensure that their art is being viewed by the right people? (57:08)

  • A peek into all that is in store for Dawn in 2021. (59:00)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

 

About My Guest

Artist Dawn Williams Boyd makes figurative textile paintings that reveal stories—not always pretty ones—about the American experience. Her latest series, The Trump Era, specifically focuses on xenophobia and immigration, but her work has also explored feminine sexuality, the Black American experience, as well as forgotten moments from American history.

Jan 14, 2021
I teach setting goals for artists. It’s the first lesson in the Art Biz Accelerator. So it may come as a surprise when you hear that this is the year that I want you to stop setting SMART goals for your art business. Far more important than setting any goal is actually doing the work. In this solo episode, I’ll tell you how to set more empowering goals that will help you take charge of your art business.

2020 was a year of great loss of so many aspects of the art business. Venues were closed, live workshops were canceled, and many businesses suffered major losses. Regardless of these disappointments, so much of these results were never in your control in the first place.

Today I want to focus on what IS in your control. You have control over your art. You get to choose how you will spend the next 24 hours. You can choose how you will invest in your business and you are in control of so much more.

As you enter this new year I want you to consider setting a new kind of goal that may just be smarter than any goal you’ve set before. And it all starts with taking total responsibility for all of the things that are in your control.

 

Highlights

 

  • New year, new goals. But what is really in your control? (0:01)

  • The best goals for your art business may not be all that SMART after all. (1:24)

  • A new approach to setting goals for your art business. (2:48)

  • You can’t control outcomes, but you can still take charge. (4:21)

  • Empower yourself by taking total responsibility in these areas. (8:06)

  • How to connect with others to increase motivation, creativity, and support. (8:24)

  • The importance of owning your life, your decisions and your career. (9:30)

  • The value of project-centred planning rather than goal-centred planning. (10:39)

  • A peek inside all of the offerings of the Art Biz Community. (11:12)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

Jan 7, 2021
Balance. The holy grail of every entrepreneurial artist’s quest. What does a balanced artist’s life look like? And what happens when you actually achieve balance? As much as I love the idea of being whisked away by my latest all-consuming project, I also know what it feels like to be out of balance. I much prefer being in charge of my time and my life, and that’s why I loved this conversation with Chris Maynard.

Chris turns feathers into intricate art. Working with delicate tools, he carves into feathers to create images of the very creatures that shed them. His unique feather sculptures are recognized by art collectors, bird lovers, and a variety of people from around the world.

In this episode, I talked with Chris about finding balance in life as well as in making and marketing art. He shares the secret behind his seemingly successful quest for balance, how he approaches requests for commissioned pieces, and the systems that he uses to stay on top of it all.

Balance may seem elusive, and, yet, we all need it in order to be our most creative and successful selves. Whether you’re currently searching for balance in your work or have already homed in on what the perfect balance means to you, this is a conversation you won’t want to miss.

Highlights

 

  • Chris Maynard explains the inspiration behind his unique artwork of carving feathers. (3:39)
  • Details about the seven galleries that represent Chris’s work. (6:55)
  • Chris’s income streams, including commissioned work, prints, and his book. (7:30)
  • Why balance is important to Chris. (11:00)
  • How Chris balances commission requests with his own creative license. (12:45)
  • Maintaining relationships with galleries while accepting commissions. (15:47)
  • Balancing commissioned pieces, for Chris, means working on one at a time. (18:04)
  • Dancing, movement, and leaving work undone are all part of Chris’s typical work week. (23:55)
  • Systems for staying on top of commissioned pieces and communications. (27:04)
  • Finding the balance between making and marketing art. (29:28)
  • Which marketing channels have brought Chris the most sales? (31:33)
  • Balancing the marketing and the making of art starts with a feeling. (38:11)
  • Chris shares the details and collaboration of his current piece. (41:03)

 

Mentioned

Resources

About My Guest

Oregon artist Chris Maynard combines his strong backgrounds in biology and ecology to pay homage to nature through the plumage of birds — using feathers acquired from legal sources such as zoos and private aviaries all naturally shed by birds. Working with delicate tools, he carves into feathers to create images of the very creatures that shed them, inventing poetic and playful compositions of birds in flight. His unique feather sculptures are recognized by art collectors, bird lovers, and a wide and interesting variety of people from around the world.

Dec 17, 2020
I don’t believe in making art for a market, I believe in making art from your soul and then finding the right audience for it. But sometimes we are lucky enough to make the art we want, then tweak it just a bit so we can broaden our audience. My guest today has found a way to do just that.

Ashley Lucas (aka Lady Lucas) is an artist whose work features smartly dressed animals and other sweet anthropomorphic characters. She has illustrated numerous children’s books, coloring books, and other cute projects. By placing her characters in the local townscape Ashley has increased the appeal of her work to a specific audience that continues to grow.

In today’s conversation, I talked with Ashley about how she came up with the idea to tap into people’s love of a specific location and how she leverages it for her prints, products, and commissioned work.

We also discuss how she connected with a community even before moving there, how she juggles her life as an artist with that as a mother of a two-year-old, and which social media platform offers the greatest return for her work (it's not Instagram).

Even if you don't "do" cute or illustrations or location-specific art, you'll want to listen to ideas for connecting to new communities.

 

Highlights

 

  • Ashley Lucas describes the inspiration behind her characters. (2:22)

  • How COVID-19 and motherhood have affected Ashley’s income streams. (6:22)

  • Juggling a growing art business and a busy two-year-old. (9:18)

  • The value that community connections bring to your art business. (13:18)

  • Distinguishing between prints and commissioned pieces and how to price each. (19:01)

  • Customizing standard city pieces without redrawing each one. (21:41)

  • How Ashley connected with her new community before moving there. (25:25)

  • How the pandemic has made a strong online presence more important than ever. (28:21)

  • Marketing through TikTok and exploring current culture. (31:20)

  • Curating email lists for artists and for promoting products. (34:13)

  • Which social media platform generates the most work for Ashley? (35:25)

  • Ashley’s strategy for promoting her web stores. (37:14)

  • The key to making your art appealing to buyers. (40:28)

  • A look at Ashley’s next project and the future of Lady Lucas. (43:00)

 

Mentioned

 

 

Resources

 

 

Dec 10, 2020
By now you may have picked up on the fact that I am a sucker for a reliable system. My signature program is called the Art Business Success System for a reason — systems work. They provide you with a framework that, once in place, you can return to repeatedly and update to match where you are at any given moment in your art business. I love figuring out systems, maybe even more than I love following them because systems are always there to support my progress. And my guest today has proven that a clearly defined system can take your art business to the next level.

Sema Martin is a full-time artist living in the French Riviera. She currently has a four-month waiting list for her pet portraits, which is due in part to the flawless 8-step system that she has developed that keeps her organized and keeps her customers satisfied.

In our conversation, Sema shares the system that she has in place for her commission-based business. We walk through the eight stages of commissioning work from her, which are clearly outlined on her website. We discuss how she standardized her sizes, how she makes it easy for clients to buy from her by offering multiple currencies, and how social media serves a dual purpose to both promote her work and to share her progress with clients. You’ll hear how she stays organized and at the end of this episode you can find out how to get a copy of her system spreadsheet.

Highlights

  • Sema shares the journey that led her to becoming a full-time commissioned artist. (2:11)

  • Income streams and the percentages of Sema’s income that comes from commissions. (5:50)

  • Developing the stages of the commission process, starting with sizing the art. (7:32)

  • What should be included in your pricing? (12:15)

  • A comparison of Squarespace and MailChimp. (14:18)

  • Contact forms and how to make sure you have proper communication with clients. (16:03)

  • The importance of collecting money before you start drawing. (20:46)

  • Handling a waiting list and details of a payment plan. (22:09)

  • Guidance for helping customers choose the details of the piece. (26:54)

  • Sema’s workflow and how she works in the drawing zone. (30:03)

  • How many social media posts should highlight your current piece? (34:24)

  • Final approval ensures that the customer is happy before the piece is shipped. (37:00)

  • Mounting, packing and delivery of the final piece and how each step ensures you will have happy customers. (37:56)

  • The bonus stage and how many customers take advantage of it. (42:08)

  • How do people find Sema? She maintains a focus on SEO that really pays off. (43:52)

  • Staying organized and implementing the systems that will keep you straight. (46:11)

  • A glimpse inside Sema’s current project. (49:06)

 

Mentioned

 

Resources

Dec 3, 2020
So many artists have benefitted from Instagram — it’s a topic that comes up frequently in these interviews, but it’s been difficult to pinpoint one key lesson to devote an entire episode to, until now. Jeanne Rosier Smith made a conscious decision to focus on using Instagram to grow her following and expand her art business and it has definitely paid off. Jeanne has been focused and deliberate in her use of the platform while also allowing a great deal of flexibility in the process.

Jeanne paints seascapes and landscapes with pastels and works with the abstract underlying designs beneath the realistic images she paints, seeing just how far she needs to go in order to maintain realism while still leaving something to the imagination. She loves pastel because the rich, pure pigments allow vibrations of color and visual mixing impossible to capture with any other medium.

In our conversation, Jeanne shares the strategies that she has used for the past three years to build a following of more than 37,000 and reach the six-figure mark in sales for each of those three years. She shares how she maintains good relationships with her eight galleries, even while selling on Instagram, and why she doesn’t schedule posts in advance.

 

Highlights

 

  • Jeanne shares her personal art history and passion for pastels. (2:08)

  • The instant feedback and fun factor that has made an Instagram strategy the right choice for Jeanne. (5:48)

  • Steps that will take your Instagram account to the next level. (7:45)

  • Connecting with collectors starts with sharing your inspiration. (11:56)

  • The frequency of your posts needs to reflect your growth goals. (14:15)

  • Which content results in the greatest connection, followers, and sales? (15:49)

  • Is the ROI worth the effort of maintaining an Instagram account? (20:41)

  • Maintaining a good relationship with galleries while growing on Instagram. (25:22)

  • Marketing opportunities that will result in sales. (28:42)

  • A look inside Jeanne’s personal collection. (33:45)

  • Do your posts need to be scheduled in advance?? (34:45)

  • A successful hashtag strategy starts with thinking like a collector. (40:09)

  • Is there a best time of day to post on Instagram? (44:46)

  • A peek at what Jeanne is currently working on. (45:51)

Mentioned

Resources

Nov 19, 2020
Blogging may seem like an art form of years gone by, replaced entirely by the quick and simple posts of Facebook or Instagram, but my guest today has proved that nurturing a blog can be one of the most beneficial and rewarding outlets that an artist can pursue, both personally and professionally. Lisa Call dove headfirst into the blogging world years ago and created such an excellent blog that I have referenced it many times both on my website and in the first three editions of my book. Unfortunately, her blog went up in flames before I could mention it in my fourth edition, but that major set back hasn’t stopped Lisa from continuing to create what I consider one of the best corners of the art blogging world.

Lisa makes textile-based art and uses hand dyed fabric to create large abstract compositions. She uses her blog not for marketing her work but as a place where she can share her opinions about art and learn more about herself and her work. In fact, Lisa credits her blog as the single greatest factor in her success as an artist.

In our conversation, she shares the benefits of blogging and why she decided to revive her blog after all those posts disappeared. We also go over some of the steps she’s taking to republish old posts and how her blog has led her to opportunities that she otherwise never would have imagined. Of course, blogging isn’t for everyone, but if you enjoy writing and sharing insights about your life as an artist, this is an episode you are going to want to listen to.

Highlights

  • Lisa shares the evolution of her textile-based abstract compositions. (2:21)

  • Why blog? Lisa offers insights into the value of blogging as a way to unite the artist community, share opinions and increase marketing. (4:08)

  • Structuring blog posts in a meaningful way. (8:40)

  • Recovering a broken website, republising missing posts, and discovering yourself along the way. (10:10)

  • Lisa’s method for categorizing her current blog posts. (19:00)

  • Defining your purpose in blogging and setting boundaries within your posts. (24:53)

  • Details of the Make Big Art blog and juggling the ins and outs of SEO for two blogs. (27:25)

  • The benefits and accountability that come with blogging about art. (33:50)

  • How to find the balance between blogging, Facebook posts and email lists. (35:30)

  • Lisa’s advice for successfully blogging about your art. (40:06)

  • A glimpse inside Lisa’s current project. (44:32)

 

Mentioned

Resources

 

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